Challenges Related to Migration and Child Attachment: A Pilot Study With South Asian Immigrant Mother–Child Dyads

Challenges Related to Migration and Child Attachment: A Pilot Study With South Asian Immigrant Mother–Child Dyads

Challenges Related to Migration and Child Attachment: A Pilot Study With South Asian Immigrant Mother–Child Dyads

Challenges Related to Migration and Child Attachment: A Pilot Study With South Asian Immigrant Mother–Child Dyadss

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Référence bibliographique [20784]

Lecompte, Vanessa, Miconi, Diana et Rousseau, Cécile. 2018. «Challenges Related to Migration and Child Attachment: A Pilot Study With South Asian Immigrant Mother–Child Dyads ». Attachment & Human Development, vol. 20, no 2, p. 208-222.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study aims to [investigate] the associations between anxiety and depression, social support, sense of belonging (to religion, to the culture of origin and to host country) and the quality of child attachment behaviors in a targeted sample of South Asian immigrant mother–child dyads experiencing high migration stress.» (p. 211)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This study takes place in the Parc-Extension neighborhood in Montreal, Quebec. […] Participants […] were 33 South Asian immigrant mothers and their child (19 boys, 14 girls) aged between 12 and 84 months […]. All parents were born outside of Canada, with 6 mothers born in Bangladesh, 12 in India, 10 in Pakistan and 5 in Sri Lanka.» (p. 211-212)

Instruments :
- Questionnaires
- Grille d’observation

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Results of this study extend [the] understanding of the association between individual and social risk factors involved in child attachment in this high risk, and often hard to reach population. This study is important as it sets foundations for further investigation of these questions. The high level of maternal anxiety and depressive symptoms observed in the present research is in line with previous studies that found similar levels of symptoms in immigrants from South Asia. All the families that were included in [this] study had an annual income under the poverty line. Results of studies show that financial insecurities after immigration are an important risk factor for anxiety and depression […]. It is one important component that forms migration stress. Income was not included in [this] study variables because the entire targeted sample is under the poverty line, but it certainly represents a crucial stressor that contributes to maternal mental health issues. [Authors] also found low levels of social support, particularly from friends.» (p. 216)