Access to Post-Secondary Education: How does Québec Compare to the Rest of Canada?

Access to Post-Secondary Education: How does Québec Compare to the Rest of Canada?

Access to Post-Secondary Education: How does Québec Compare to the Rest of Canada?

Access to Post-Secondary Education: How does Québec Compare to the Rest of Canada?s

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Référence bibliographique [20662]

Finnie, Ross et Mueller, Richard E. 2017. «Access to Post-Secondary Education: How does Québec Compare to the Rest of Canada? ». L’Actualité Économique, vol. 93, no 3, p. 441-474.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This article «present[s] empirical evidence on access to PSE [post-secondary education] for Québec in comparison to other provinces in Canada.» (p. 443)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The data used in the analysis are taken from the Youth in Transition Survey, Cohort A (generally known as YITS-A). The YITS-A […] follows all young people born in 1984 (and thus age 15 as of December 31, 1999) through their high school years and through to the decision to enter PSE. […] The YITS-A data used here consist of four cycles, corresponding to the surveys and interviews undertaken in 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006. The first cycle (in 2000) includes not only questionnaires that were completed by the 15-year-old student respondents, but also interviews that were completed with their parents and high school officials.» (p. 445)

Instruments :
- Questionnaires
- Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«[T]he results generally point to the importance of cultural, rather than financial, factors in determining whether a young person attends PSE, perhaps best illustrated by the much stronger effect of parental education on access to PSE as compared to family income, and how immigrant children go to PSE at much higher rates than non-immigrant children (although the breakdown in this pattern for more recent immigrants to Québec is noted).» (p. 471) For example, the «Québec youth in our sample who come from low-income households (those that have a combined parental annual income of less than $50,000) have an overall rate of PSE attendance that is 15.5 percentage points lower than those from families with higher incomes in the Québec sample, while their university participation rate is 17.6 percentage points lower (19.7 percent for low-income students versus 37.3 percent for the higher income group). [Moreover, in] Québec, students with no family background of PSE attendance have an overall PSE participation rate that is an even greater 24.2 percentage points lower than that of students with at least one parent who attended PSE. This gap is the widest in the country. More dramatically, the university participation rate of first-generation PSE students is less than half that of non-first generation PSE students, at 16.7 percent and 38.5 percent, respectively.» (p. 458)