Temporary Placements: A Crisis-Management Strategy for Physically Abused Children?

Temporary Placements: A Crisis-Management Strategy for Physically Abused Children?

Temporary Placements: A Crisis-Management Strategy for Physically Abused Children?

Temporary Placements: A Crisis-Management Strategy for Physically Abused Children?s

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Référence bibliographique [20459]

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This article aims «to describe the context in which temporary placements are used in Quebec by examining the reasons as to why CPS [child-protection service] implements this type of intervention with regards to physical abuse.» (p. 316)

Questions/Hypothèses :
Authors «hypothesized that children involved in cases of physical abuse were more likely to encounter temporary placements than children investigated or at risk for other forms of maltreatment. Additionally, [they] also hypothesized that children who had experienced physical abuse alone would be less likely to receive planned, longer-term placements.» (p. 316)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The present study was based on a secondary analysis of data from an evaluation of Quebec’s Youth Protection Act […]. The data used involved two population cohorts of all children (n = 17,101) investigated by Quebec’s CPS. The first cohort from September 2007 to August 2008 and the second one from January to December 2009. After being investigated, these children were followed for three to four years, depending on which cohort they were admitted to. Data of children who experienced at least one placement (n = 10,181) were extracted from both cohorts in our analysis.» (p. 316)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«From this study, we can conclude that temporary placements serve an important function in CPS’s mandate in protecting children who are being physically abused and who cannot remain living at home. Temporary placements can thus be seen as a circumstantial crisis-management strategy that does not always lead to a longer-term placement. Given that 6.5 out of every 10 children who experience temporary placements experience planned placements as well, the use of temporary placements evolves more generally toward a complex placement trajectory. In our view, this situation demands a more in-depth understanding of the relevance of temporary placements from the standpoint of stability in living settings. While the literature on children’s placements and their instability is already extensive, in particular because the need to study the services offered to the most vulnerable children is amply justified, there are still very few studies that focus more closely on short-term, unplanned placements. Our study sheds a bit more light on the context in which temporary placements are used. However, the impact that such placements have on children and on their placement trajectories remain unknown. The climate of urgency surrounding a temporary placement might have repercussions on it. […] We recommend, in particular, a closer look at the outcomes of temporary placements.» (p. 322)