Taking Child Abuse and Mothering into Account: Intersectional Feminism as an Alternative for the Study of Domestic Violence

Taking Child Abuse and Mothering into Account: Intersectional Feminism as an Alternative for the Study of Domestic Violence

Taking Child Abuse and Mothering into Account: Intersectional Feminism as an Alternative for the Study of Domestic Violence

Taking Child Abuse and Mothering into Account: Intersectional Feminism as an Alternative for the Study of Domestic Violences

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Référence bibliographique [2040]

Damant, Dominique, Lapierre, Simon, Kouraga, Anne, Fortin, Andrée, Hamelin Brabant, Louise, Lavergne, Chantal et Lessard, Geneviève. 2008. «Taking Child Abuse and Mothering into Account: Intersectional Feminism as an Alternative for the Study of Domestic Violence ». Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work, vol. 23, no 2, p. 123-133.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This article presents our journey through the development of an alternative theoretical perspective for the study of domestic violence, child abuse, and mothering and draws on the research design that we developed in our study to illustrate some of the possible empirical applications of this theoretical perspective. » (p. 124)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« Our research has drawn on a qualitative methodology and has involved a sample of approximately 80 women; the part of the project that has been conducted by the main research team has involved 40 women, and the parts conducted by the students have each involved an additional 10 women. » (p. 130)

Instruments :
Canevas d’entrevue

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


« Feminist scholars have been engaged in an ongoing debate to determine which theoretical perspective offers the best framework for understanding domestic violence, and this debate has been crystallized around two pole positions: radical and postmodern feminism. This article presents a journey throughout the development of a theoretical perspective for the study of domestic violence, child abuse, and mothering. It argues that the intersectional feminist perspective has much to offer these debates and that it constitutes a promising theoretical framework for understanding domestic violence that takes into account issues of child abuse and mothering. » (p. 123)