The Intimate Lives of Older Adults Living with HIV: A Qualitative Study of the Challenges Associated with the Intersection of HIV and Ageing

The Intimate Lives of Older Adults Living with HIV: A Qualitative Study of the Challenges Associated with the Intersection of HIV and Ageing

The Intimate Lives of Older Adults Living with HIV: A Qualitative Study of the Challenges Associated with the Intersection of HIV and Ageing

The Intimate Lives of Older Adults Living with HIV: A Qualitative Study of the Challenges Associated with the Intersection of HIV and Ageings

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [20399]

Wallach, Isabelle et Brotman, Shari. 2018. «The Intimate Lives of Older Adults Living with HIV: A Qualitative Study of the Challenges Associated with the Intersection of HIV and Ageing ». Ageing & Society, vol. 38, no 12, p. 1-29.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This study analyses the «the obstacles to maintaining an intimate and sexual life among older adults living with HIV [human immunodeficiency virus].» (p. 19)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Respondents were recruited from a Montreal (Canada) medical clinic specialising in HIV/AIDS [acquired immune deficiency syndrome]. The sample included 38 persons living with HIV between the ages of 50 and 73 […].» (p. 5)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


Results show that «the stigma associated with HIV and seropositivity disclosure surfaced as a significant challenge for our participants, whether this stigma involved the fear of rejection, the actual rejection experienced after disclosing seropositivity or the difficulty of disclosing one’s HIV status in an intimate context. Our study adds the identification of ageism as a central form of stigma experienced by older adults living with HIV, which can interact with HIV-related stigma. Several men who have sex with men who participated in the study discussed age-related discrimination as a primary source of difficulty when seeking a new intimate partner. Their responses also revealed that such age-related exclusion often begins earlier in life, prior to their fifties. These statements support research observations involving the gay community as a whole that highlight an idealisation of youth and a devaluing of ageing among gay men in particular […].» (p. 19) Moreover, several «participants shared their reticence to commit to a new intimate relationship since losing their spouse to AIDS, even if the death occurred many years ago. This was especially true for those who accompanied their spouse throughout their disease and final stages of their life.» (p. 18)