The Development of Self-Esteem in Relation to Parental and Peer Attachment Among Low-Income Urban Youth

The Development of Self-Esteem in Relation to Parental and Peer Attachment Among Low-Income Urban Youth

The Development of Self-Esteem in Relation to Parental and Peer Attachment Among Low-Income Urban Youth

The Development of Self-Esteem in Relation to Parental and Peer Attachment Among Low-Income Urban Youths

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Référence bibliographique [20316]

Weva, Vanessa. 2018. «The Development of Self-Esteem in Relation to Parental and Peer Attachment Among Low-Income Urban Youth». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université McGill, Département d’éducation et de psychologie du counseling.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The focus of this study is to explore the influence of mother, father, and peer attachment, respectively on the six domains of self-esteem (perceptions of scholastic competence, social competence, athletic competence, physical appearance, behavioral conduct, and global selfworth) […] among youth from low-SES [socioeconomic status] backgrounds between the ages of 8 and 14 years old.» (p. 17)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«To what extent are mother, father, and peer attachment, as measured by the degree to which participants perceive that their parents (mother and father) and peers are trustworthy and responsive, have on the six domains of self-esteem of youth from low-SES urban backgrounds?» (p. 17)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The participants were 59 youth (female = 25) between the 8 and 14 years old […] recruited from an overnight summer camp for low-SES youth from Montreal. The household family income fell below $57,000 Canadian for all the participants […].» (p. 18)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The findings from this study suggest that youth-father attachment promotes HSE [high self-esteem] in terms of perceptions of social competence among low-income urban youth. Additional analyses revealed that this relationship was significant among youth from non-resident father households. Particularly, secure relations with non-resident fathers should be encouraged among youth from low-income areas to promote HSE and foster adaptive development in high-risk contexts.» (p. 2) The author notes that «[t]his significant relation among non-resident father attachment and increased perceptions of social-competence in the current study may be explained by the presence of more variability in father attachment among youth from non-resident father households as compared to youth who live with their father […].» (p. 23) Finally, «[o]nly father attachment was found to be associated with increased self-esteem, and specifically in terms of perceptions of social competence. This finding suggests that beyond the negative influences of poverty, such as social and emotional maladaptation […], father relations that are perceived as being responsive and trustworthy may act as a protective factor against negative self-evaluations of social competence […], thereby fostering wellbeing in the face of adversity.» (p. 21-22)