Mixed Identity and Cultural Transmission : Narratives of Mixed-Blood Women from a First Nations Community

Mixed Identity and Cultural Transmission : Narratives of Mixed-Blood Women from a First Nations Community

Mixed Identity and Cultural Transmission : Narratives of Mixed-Blood Women from a First Nations Community

Mixed Identity and Cultural Transmission : Narratives of Mixed-Blood Women from a First Nations Communitys

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [20189]

Chow, Emilie. 2017. «Mixed Identity and Cultural Transmission : Narratives of Mixed-Blood Women from a First Nations Community». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université de Montréal, Département de sociologie.

Accéder à la publication

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The following study aims to add to the body of knowledge on mixed-blood Indigenous identity in Canada by addressing the voices of women of mixed parentage from a First Nations community, the Mohawk reserve of Kahnawà:ke […]. The objective is to better understand their identity choices and experiences of growing up racially mixed. I am also interested in understanding if and how Mohawk culture and ways of life are perpetuated in Mixed-Mohawk families.» (p. 10)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«What are some of the factors that influence Kahnawà:ke Mixed Mohawk women’s sense of identity and belonging to the community? […] Which cultural practices or ways of life did their families transmit to our participants and what do they consider important to transmit to subsequent generations?» (p. 54)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de six femmes. «All of the women who participated had to have a mother of Mohawk origin and a Non-Native father. […] At the time of the study, half the participants resided in Kahnawà:ke, and the other half in the Montreal area.» (p. 57-58)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«[W]e have shown that identity includes all that one has encountered individually as well as collectively […]. It is a combination of one’s nurturing and alienating experiences. […] In this study, we have shown that engaging in the process of personal meaning-making practices can foster human resilience. As a result, one no longer feels alone, and no invisible border can restrict one’s ability to access their culture when it is recognized as such. Once recognized, one is free to choose their own path to nurture their sense of self and strengthen their cultural identity and sense of belonging. In doing so for oneself, one is disposed to facilitate and influence the transmission of culture and identity to the next generation, which the participants in this study have described doing in various ways.» (p. 120) «The overall trend was that the participants felt more connected to the Mohawk side of their family because their parents made it a point to maintain strong ties with their Mohawk family and they wished to instill typical Mohawk values. […] In this study, the extended Mohawk family made efforts to include them and kept them involved with the community. The love and support provided by elder members of the maternal family, especially grandparents, were important for building self-esteem and transmitting a sense of pride to them when the participants were children.» (p. 115)