End-of-Life Care and the Grieving Process: Family Caregivers who Have Experienced the Loss of a Terminal-Phase Cancer Patient

End-of-Life Care and the Grieving Process: Family Caregivers who Have Experienced the Loss of a Terminal-Phase Cancer Patient

End-of-Life Care and the Grieving Process: Family Caregivers who Have Experienced the Loss of a Terminal-Phase Cancer Patient

End-of-Life Care and the Grieving Process: Family Caregivers who Have Experienced the Loss of a Terminal-Phase Cancer Patients

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Référence bibliographique [2001]

Dumont, Isabelle, Dumont, Serge et Mongeau, Suzanne. 2008. «End-of-Life Care and the Grieving Process: Family Caregivers who Have Experienced the Loss of a Terminal-Phase Cancer Patient ». Qualitative Health Research, vol. 18, no 8, p. 1049-1061.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« In this study, we focus on the experience of family caregivers who provided care to a terminal-phase cancer patient and, more specifically, on their bereavement experience. » (p. 1050)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« From the perspective of bereaved family caregivers, what are the elements of the caregiving experience that significantly influence (positively or negatively) adjustment to bereavement? » (p. 1050)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
18 family caregivers

Instruments :
Guide d’entrevue

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« Family caregivers of a loved one with advanced cancer are at risk for developing bereavement complications following the loss of the person they cared for. However, little research has studied caregiving and bereavement experiences as an ongoing process. This study was conducted with the aim of identifying the main elements constitutive of the experience of providing care and assistance to a patient with terminal cancer that influence the grieving process. This qualitative study, conducted among 18 family caregivers, led to the specification of six principal dimensions of the caregiving experience: characteristics of the family caregiver and of the patient, symptoms of the illness, the relational context, social and professional support, and circumstances surrounding the death. Among these dimensions, the constituent elements of the caregiving experience that might positively or negatively influence the grieving process were identified. This knowledge is useful for a more perspicuous identification of caregivers who might experience bereavement complications. » (p. 1049)