Gender’s Role in Exposure to Interparental Violence, Acceptance of Violence, Self-Efficacy, and Physical Teen Dating Violence Among Quebec Adolescents

Gender’s Role in Exposure to Interparental Violence, Acceptance of Violence, Self-Efficacy, and Physical Teen Dating Violence Among Quebec Adolescents

Gender’s Role in Exposure to Interparental Violence, Acceptance of Violence, Self-Efficacy, and Physical Teen Dating Violence Among Quebec Adolescents

Gender’s Role in Exposure to Interparental Violence, Acceptance of Violence, Self-Efficacy, and Physical Teen Dating Violence Among Quebec Adolescentss

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Référence bibliographique [19957]

Ruel, Catherine, Lavoie, Francine, Hebert, Martine et Blais, Martin. 2017. «Gender’s Role in Exposure to Interparental Violence, Acceptance of Violence, Self-Efficacy, and Physical Teen Dating Violence Among Quebec Adolescents ». Journal of Interpersonal Violence, vol. 35, no 15-16, p. 3079-3101.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The aim of our study is to investigate gender differences in the relationships among EIPV [exposure to interparental violence], acceptance of physical TDV [teen dating violence], self-efficacy to disclose TDV, and victimization and perpetration of physical TDV.» (p. 5)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«It is hypothesized that Hypothesis 1 (H1): Acceptance of violence is a mediator of the relationship between EIPV and physical TDV victimization and perpetration. If this mediated relationship is found to be significant, the model will be explored regarding (H1a) the differences between mother-to-father violence and father-to-mother violence regarding acceptance of violence and physical TDV and (H1b) the differences between acceptance of girlinflicted violence and acceptance of boy-inflicted violence in the relation between EIPV and physical TDV. It is also hypothesized that Hypothesis 2 (H2): Higher EIPV is associated with a lower sense of self-efficacy to disclose physical TDV, which is linked to a higher level of physical TDV perpetration and victimization. Therefore, the perception of self-efficacy is a mediator of the relationship between EIPV and physical TDV.» (p. 5-6)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data collected in the Quebec Youth’s Romantic Relationship Survey Project (QYRRS Project), a longitudinal self-reported survey, were used in our study. [T]he data from Waves 1 and 2 of the QYRRS were used. Wave 1 occurred in autumn 2011, and Wave 2 took place 6 months later. […] The final sample of our study included 2,564 adolescents (63.8% girls) with a mean age of 15.29 years […]. The majority of our sample (58.4%) lived with both parents.» (p. 6)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Four main findings emerged from this study. First, there were gender differences in the models, as only boys’ victimization was significantly accounted for by some predictors, whereas both victimization and perpetration of physical TDV were significantly predicted for girls. Second, there was no distinct effect of exposure to mother-to-father or father-to-mother violence on the models (H1a). Third, only acceptance of girl-inflicted violence was predictive of physical TDV among the models (H1b). Fourth, there was no link between EIPV and self-efficacy or between self-efficacy and physical TDV for either gender (H2). Finally, the risk factors explained only a small part of the variance of physical TDV. […] As hypothesized (H1), teenagers more highly exposed to interparental violence were more likely to accept violence in dating relationships, which increased their risk of experiencing physical TDV. However, this relationship was significant only for acceptance of girl-inflicted violence.» (p. 14-15)