Low-Income Working Immigrant Families in Quebec: Exploring their Challenges to Well-Being

Low-Income Working Immigrant Families in Quebec: Exploring their Challenges to Well-Being

Low-Income Working Immigrant Families in Quebec: Exploring their Challenges to Well-Being

Low-Income Working Immigrant Families in Quebec: Exploring their Challenges to Well-Beings

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Référence bibliographique [19945]

Pitt, Rebecca S., Sherman, Jessica et Macdonald, Mary Ellen. 2016. «Low-Income Working Immigrant Families in Quebec: Exploring their Challenges to Well-Being ». Revue canadienne de santé publique / Canadian Journal of Public Health, vol. 106, no 8, p. e539-e545.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The authors aim to identify «the health challenges of low-income working families who access a Montreal food bank [and] the barriers and facilitators for these specific families with regard to navigating those challenges […].» (p. e540)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur la participation de 22 immigrants installés à Montréal à des entrevues ou des discussions de groupe.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif (pour 10 participants)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Low-income working families are more likely to be immigrants, supported through non-standard work, food insecure, and with poor access to health services. To date, exploration of the health challenges faced by these families has focused primarily on employment, income and food insecurity as factors affecting health. […] Overall, three salient findings are especially interesting: first, that our sample was exclusively immigrants, although recruited from a setting largely frequented by but not intended specifically for immigrants. Second, through listening to participants’ stories, we had to expand our own conception of health into what participants were clearly describing as a broader conception of “well-being”. Finally, our work corroborates the literature showing how the immigration experience is itself the root of many of their challenges (e.g., relocation and integration, acculturation, professional equivalency, lowered social status and difficulty finding stable employment) but furthers this evidence by showing how their challenges to wellbeing, though not exclusive to an immigration experience (e.g., low income, difficult employment and food insecurity), were still greatly informed by it.» (p. e543)