Targeted or Universal Coverage? Assessing Heterogeneity in the Effects of Universal Child Care

Targeted or Universal Coverage? Assessing Heterogeneity in the Effects of Universal Child Care

Targeted or Universal Coverage? Assessing Heterogeneity in the Effects of Universal Child Care

Targeted or Universal Coverage? Assessing Heterogeneity in the Effects of Universal Child Cares

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [19877]

Kottelenberg, Michael J. et Lehrer, Steven F. 2017. «Targeted or Universal Coverage? Assessing Heterogeneity in the Effects of Universal Child Care ». Journal of Labor Economics, vol. 35, no 3, p. 609-653.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Our study provides new evidence on the effectiveness of universal child care policy by exploring distributional treatment effects from the only largescale universal subsidization of child care in North America, the 1997 Quebec Family Policy.» (p. 611) «To shed light on a mechanism underlying the heterogeneous pattern of distributional effect estimates, we […] examine how childrearing practices and family functioning changed in response to the policy.» (p. 612)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«[W]e use the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY).» (p. 613)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our analysis uncovers substantial policy-relevant heterogeneity in the estimated effect of access to subsidized child care across two developmental score distributions for children from two-parent families. Our estimates first reveal a more nuanced image that formal child care can indeed boost developmental outcomes for children from single-parent households, particularly for the most disadvantaged. We also find striking differences in the distributional effects across child gender that differ across developmental scores. Our empirical analysis is suggestive that the heterogeneity in policy effects also emerges from differences in home learning environments that were present prior to the policy and were altered in response to the policy. In particular, we find that the subsamples exhibiting the largest negative effects from gaining access to child care also have large declines in parenting practices such as reading to the child daily for those who took up child care in response to the policy. […] As a whole, [results suggest] that while formal child care is not a perfect substitute for home learning environments, given the large number of hours spent in child care centers, it may provide a remedy for children from the most disadvantaged home environments.» (p. 647)