Sleep Bruxism-Tooth Grinding Prevalence, Characteristics and Familial Aggregation: A Large Cross-Sectional Survey and Polysomnographic Validation

Sleep Bruxism-Tooth Grinding Prevalence, Characteristics and Familial Aggregation: A Large Cross-Sectional Survey and Polysomnographic Validation

Sleep Bruxism-Tooth Grinding Prevalence, Characteristics and Familial Aggregation: A Large Cross-Sectional Survey and Polysomnographic Validation

Sleep Bruxism-Tooth Grinding Prevalence, Characteristics and Familial Aggregation: A Large Cross-Sectional Survey and Polysomnographic Validations

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Référence bibliographique [19876]

Khoury, Samar, Carra, Maria Clotilde, Huynh, Nelly, Montplaisir, Jacques et Lavigne, Gilles J. 2016. «Sleep Bruxism-Tooth Grinding Prevalence, Characteristics and Familial Aggregation: A Large Cross-Sectional Survey and Polysomnographic Validation ». Sleep: Journal of Sleep and Sleep Disorders Research, vol. 39, no 11, p. 2049-2056.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In the present study, our aims are to: (1) revisit the prevalence of reported sleep bruxism [SB] tooth grinding awareness using a cross-sectional survey from the general population; (2) determine the association between SB-tooth grinding awareness with other comorbidities including chronic pain, pain medication use, and sleep disturbances; (3) estimate the relative risk of reporting SB in first-degree relatives of SB probands, using previously recorded sleep laboratory data from a cohort of young SB-tooth grinding adults using diagnosis validated research criteria.» (p. 2049)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The study is based on a «sample of 6,357 adult individuals from the general population in Quebec, Canada […].» (p. 2050)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


In the light of their study, authors show that «[e]vidence has emerged showing that familial factors may contribute to the occurrence of SB, and this conclusion is important and opens the door for further genetic investigation. In fact, results show that relatives of SB positive probands have an increased risk of SB awareness compared to relatives of SB negative probands. The crude recurrence risk of reporting SB in positive probands is around 2, and is proportional to the severity of SB. Also, SB probands show a 2.9 relative risk of having a first-degree relative with reported SB. This relative risk is augmented to 4.6 when the diagnosis of SB is established using polysomnography. We observed that one third of SB subjects diagnosed by polysomnography report at least one first-degree relative also suffering from SB. However, the severity of SB, measured by RMMA [rhythmic masticatory muscle activity] frequency, does not affect the percentage of affected family members with SB.» (p. 2055)