Early Warm-Rewarding Parenting Moderates the Genetic Contributions to Callous–Unemotional Traits in Childhood

Early Warm-Rewarding Parenting Moderates the Genetic Contributions to Callous–Unemotional Traits in Childhood

Early Warm-Rewarding Parenting Moderates the Genetic Contributions to Callous–Unemotional Traits in Childhood

Early Warm-Rewarding Parenting Moderates the Genetic Contributions to Callous–Unemotional Traits in Childhoods

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Référence bibliographique [19864]

Henry, Jeffrey, Dionne, Ginette, Viding, Essi, Vitaro, Frank, Brendgen, Mara, Tremblay, Richard E. et Boivin, Michel. 2018. «Early Warm-Rewarding Parenting Moderates the Genetic Contributions to Callous–Unemotional Traits in Childhood ». Journal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry, vol. 59, no 12, p. 1282-1288.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of this study was to determine whether early warm/rewarding parenting (63 months) moderates the relative importance of genetic and environmental contributions to childhood CU [callous–unemotional] traits (7, 9, 10, and 12 years).» (p. 1283)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were from the Quebec Newborn Twin Study (QNTS; Boivin et al., 2013). Over 660 families from the Greater Montreal area were initially enrolled (1995–1998) and followed annually from birth on a host of individual, social, family, and school characteristics.» (p. 1283)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our [analysis] showed that genetic factors accounted for a substantial degree of individual differences in CU traits, but the multivariate genetic modeling indicated that the degree of genetic influence on variation in CU traits was weaker in environments characterized by early warm/rewarding parenting. The high heritability of CU traits is consistent with past twin studies […]. The present study also found a modest negative association between warm/rewarding parenting and CU traits. […] Most importantly, the present study allowed the investigation of gene–environment interplay with respect to the relative importance of genetic and environmental factors in accounting for individual differences in CU traits in parenting environments varying in warmth/rewards. The genetic contributions to individual differences in CU traits were lower in environments characterized by higher warm/rewarding parenting, compared with environments characterized by lower warm/rewarding parenting. In addition, the modest phenotypic association between warm/rewarding parenting and CU traits was not accounted for by genes […].» (p. 1285-1286)