Sibling Influence on Access to Marriage: A Comparative Study of Quebec and Flanders, 1842-1912

Sibling Influence on Access to Marriage: A Comparative Study of Quebec and Flanders, 1842-1912

Sibling Influence on Access to Marriage: A Comparative Study of Quebec and Flanders, 1842-1912

Sibling Influence on Access to Marriage: A Comparative Study of Quebec and Flanders, 1842-1912s

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Référence bibliographique [19788]

Caron, Marianne, Neyrinck, Ward, Dillon, Lisa Y. et Matthijs, Koenraad. 2017. «Sibling Influence on Access to Marriage: A Comparative Study of Quebec and Flanders, 1842-1912 ». Journal of Family History, vol. 42, no 3, p. 271-307.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«We compare the marriage patterns of a North American region, the frontier population of SLSJ [Saguenay–Lac St-Jean] in the French region of Canada, and a Northwest European region, the district of Antwerp in the Flemish region of Belgium. First, we wish to explore how marriage patterns vary between and within these two particular contexts that present markedly different economic and demographic regimes.» (p. 275) «We explore a series of hypotheses related to sibship […]. In addition, we will investigate the possibility of competition between siblings for access to marriage and whether such competition differs within and between contexts.» (p. 277)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«For our analysis, we will use two data sets that cover a similar time frame, BALSAC for SLSJ and the COR*-database for Antwerp. [W]e restricted our analysis for this project to the period 1842–1912.» (p. 277)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«[O]ur analysis […] shows expected variations between the two regions related to age at first marriage but also some interesting similarities concerning the effects of siblings and parents. […] First, our results confirmed the earlier age at marriage in North American SLSJ compared to European Antwerp. However, we also identified a transformation in the marriage patterns for Antwerp, with a decrease in men’s age at marriage resulting in a similar age at first marriage for Antwerp and SLSJ men born after 1875. [I]n both contexts, we found a later age at first marriage for the sons with higher-class/middle-class fathers, suggesting elites took more care in the spouse selection process or could also expect their son to invest a period of time in education and training, thus delaying marriage. […] Finally, we found rich evidence of sibling influence on access to marriage. Even though families were larger in SLSJ, potentially creating more competition among siblings in that region, our descriptive results showed that more siblings actually married in SLSJ. Thus, the SLSJ population manifested both high marital fertility and high marriage intensity. In addition, the number of siblings itself did not influence the age at first marriage in both regions. [...] In general, our results from Antwerp and SLSJ suggest that sibling competition for marriage resources and birthrank effects existed simultaneously and were probably interrelated.» (p. 299-300)