Shared Parenting in Canada: Increasing Use but Continued Controversy

Shared Parenting in Canada: Increasing Use but Continued Controversy

Shared Parenting in Canada: Increasing Use but Continued Controversy

Shared Parenting in Canada: Increasing Use but Continued Controversys

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Référence bibliographique [19757]

Bala, Nicholas, Birnbaum, Rachel, Poitras, Karine, Saini, Michael, Cyr, Francine et LeClair, Shawna. 2017. «Shared Parenting in Canada: Increasing Use but Continued Controversy ». Family Court Review, vol. 55, no 4, p. 513-530.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The aim of this study is to shed some light on the parenting practice in Canadian provinces.

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Les données proviennent de plusieurs études menées par Statistique Canada.

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Comparing Ontario and Quebec, authors note that «[m]ost of the Ontario and Quebec cases were resolved without a trial (98% and 95%, respectively); the Quebec cases had more use of shared and joint custody but had more trials about parenting. Shared custody (at least 40% of the time with each parent) was significantly more likely in Quebec if the parents used mediation, had higher incomes, reported low levels of interparental conflict, or had children over the age of three years old.» (p. 520) Data also shows that Quebec has the lowest rate of sole custudy: «Ontario had by far the highest rate of sole custody (65%), almost more than twice the rate of Alberta and British Columbia (32%), while in Quebec only 6% of the cases were sole custody.» (p. 521) Results show that «[t]he experiences in Quebec, British Columbia, and Alberta suggest that the statutory abandonment of the traditional concepts like custody and access—with their focus on parental rights—is associated with greater use of various forms of shared parenting if not causally connected.» (p. 526)