Timing and Chronicity of Maternal Depression Symptoms and Children’s Verbal Abilities

Timing and Chronicity of Maternal Depression Symptoms and Children’s Verbal Abilities

Timing and Chronicity of Maternal Depression Symptoms and Children’s Verbal Abilities

Timing and Chronicity of Maternal Depression Symptoms and Children’s Verbal Abilitiess

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [19751]

Ahun, Marilyn N., Geoffroy, Marie-Claude, Herba, Catherine M., Brendgen, Mara, Séguin, Jean R., Sutter-Dallay, Anne-Laure, Boivin, Michel, Tremblay, Richard E. et Côté, Sylvana M. 2017. «Timing and Chronicity of Maternal Depression Symptoms and Children’s Verbal Abilities ». The Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 190, p. 251-257.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
The authors test «the association between timing and chronicity of MDS [maternal depression symptoms] exposure and children’s verbal abilities using a population-based cohort study.» (p. 251)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«We hypothesized that (1) children exposed to early MDS would have lower scores on a test of verbal abilities compared with children exposed later during early childhood and that, (2) children exposed to elevated MDS over a longer period of time would have lower scores on this measure than children exposed for shorter periods.» (p. 251-252)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Data were drawn from the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development […]. Participants were recruited via the Quebec Birth Registry using a stratified procedure based on living area and birth rate. The initial sample included n=2120 infants born in Quebec in 1997-1998. Our analysis sample included n=1073 mother-child pairs […].» (p. 252)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«In our population-based birth cohort (n=1073), 37.8% of mothers reported elevated MDS (eg, experiencing few symptoms a lot of the time or many symptoms at least some of the time over the past week) at least once during the first 5 years of the target child’s life. However, only children exposed to chronic MDS had significantly lower verbal abilities during middle childhood (ages 5-10 years). Specifically, children exposed chronically had lower scores than those never exposed and those exposed early or late. […] Maternal verbal IQ [intelligence quotient] and native language, as well as family SES, were the main predictors of children’s verbal abilities […].These results illustrate that multiple family factors are involved in the long-term development of verbal abilities and points to the importance of addressing the wider psychosocial environments of families affected by MDS in interventions.» (p. 254-255)