Transforming Challenges into Action: Researching the Experience of Parents of Gender-Creative Children Through Social Action and Self-Directed Groupwork

Transforming Challenges into Action: Researching the Experience of Parents of Gender-Creative Children Through Social Action and Self-Directed Groupwork

Transforming Challenges into Action: Researching the Experience of Parents of Gender-Creative Children Through Social Action and Self-Directed Groupwork

Transforming Challenges into Action: Researching the Experience of Parents of Gender-Creative Children Through Social Action and Self-Directed Groupworks

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This chapter discusses a project geared toward gaining a better understanding of [parents or caregivers of gender-creative creative] experience, including the challenges these parents and caregivers face while negotiating the environments in which their children grow. This chapter also addresses the issues of working directly with parents in order to facilitate mutual support, collective mobilization and action on the challenges identified in the research.» (p. 159)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
This research is based on 14 parent group meetings, «a group was organized within local partner in Montreal where bi-monthly meetings were held over a period of 9 months.» (p. 161)

Instruments :
In this study, «we have used Self-Directed Groupwork as a specific means both to collect data, and to work with parents so that empowerment and transformation are possible.» (p. 161)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«Over the course of the sessions, the group articulated a number of needs that must be fulfilled in order for their children to enjoy greater health and well-being, and for the parents to more effectively support and protect them. Increasing their visibility and promoting the recognition of gender-creative and transgender youth were central. As discussed in this chapter, these parents identified a number of difficulties, from a lack of services to direct discrimination and oppression. Whether by disseminating knowledge on the topic , making people more aware of their existence, developing new services or working to change the law, participants felt that it was essential to redress the invisibilty and stigma faced by these children and their families. As a result of these discussions, participants also became aware of the fondamental rights of their children would need to be secured through legal challenges.» (p. 168)