Poverty and Behavior Problems Trajectories from 1.5 to 8 Years of Age: Is the Gap Widening Between Poor and Non-Poor Children?

Poverty and Behavior Problems Trajectories from 1.5 to 8 Years of Age: Is the Gap Widening Between Poor and Non-Poor Children?

Poverty and Behavior Problems Trajectories from 1.5 to 8 Years of Age: Is the Gap Widening Between Poor and Non-Poor Children?

Poverty and Behavior Problems Trajectories from 1.5 to 8 Years of Age: Is the Gap Widening Between Poor and Non-Poor Children?s

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [19626]

Mazza, Julie Rachel S. E., Boivin, Michel, Tremblay, Richard E., Gregory, Michel, Salla, Julie, Lambert, Jean, Zunzunegui, Maria Victoria et Côté, Sylvana M. 2016. «Poverty and Behavior Problems Trajectories from 1.5 to 8 Years of Age: Is the Gap Widening Between Poor and Non-Poor Children? ». Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology, vol. 51, no 8, p. 1083-1092.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«There were two primary objectives to the study. First, we wanted to examine whether poverty predicts changes in behavior problems between 1.5 and 8 years of age. […] The second objective was to estimate potential selection bias on the association between poverty, behavior problems, and age.» (p. 1084)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«We hypothesized that poverty would increase behavior problems with age. [W]e also hypothesized that predicted poverty estimates would be smaller due to retention of the healthier and wealthier participants in the study.» (p. 1084)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«We used the 1998–2006 waves of the Quebec Longitudinal Study of Child Development (QLSCD).» (p. 1084)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Findings revealed that poverty predicted higher trajectories of behavior problems over time, and that patterns of poverty-age interactions differed according to subtypes of behavior problems. Specifically, children who remained poor at all 7 years exhibited increasing levels of hyperactivity and opposition at a faster rate up to 5 years and decreasing levels at a slower rate afterwards. In contrast, physical aggression levels decrease overtime at a stable rate for both poor and non-poor children. […] The results from this study extend previous findings by showing that the gap in hyperactivity/opposition between poor and non-poor children increases from early-to-middle childhood. Thus, it seems that hyperactivity/opposition disparities between poor children and others increases over the length of time spent in poverty. Further, the acceleration of hyperactivity/opposition over time for persistently poor children not only mirrors what was suggested by a previous study, but now extends poverty-time association over a longer period. Importantly, the gap in physical aggression trajectories between poor and non-poor children can be observed as early as age 1.5 years. However, the association between poverty and physical aggression, rather than increasing with age, remained constant from early-to-middle childhood.» (p. 1089-1090)