Resilience, Violence, and Early Pregnancy: A Qualitative Study of the Processes Used by Young Mothers to Overcome Adversities

Resilience, Violence, and Early Pregnancy: A Qualitative Study of the Processes Used by Young Mothers to Overcome Adversities

Resilience, Violence, and Early Pregnancy: A Qualitative Study of the Processes Used by Young Mothers to Overcome Adversities

Resilience, Violence, and Early Pregnancy: A Qualitative Study of the Processes Used by Young Mothers to Overcome Adversitiess

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Référence bibliographique [19608]

Lévesque, Sylvie et Chamberland, Claire. 2016. «Resilience, Violence, and Early Pregnancy: A Qualitative Study of the Processes Used by Young Mothers to Overcome Adversities ». Sage Open Access, p. 1-15.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«To better examine the processes involved in coping with violence during the perinatal period, the present study aimed to explore resilience and IPV [intimate partner violence] in early motherhood, defined as occurring before the age of 20.» (p. 3)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«How do women giving birth in a context of dual adversity, namely, young motherhood and IPV, overcome these adversities?» (p. 3)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
The sample includes «10 French-speaking mothers living in the Montréal metropolitan area […].» (p. 3)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The results of the qualitative analyses highlighted certain protective and promotive processes by which these women overcame these adversities. First, maternal identity and the creation of a bond with the child provided a turning point. Subsequently, they took an active stance to respond to victimization, acted proactively to adjust to motherhood, and used the past to move forward by reinvesting skills and knowledge they had gained from previous experiences. […] According to our results, the creation of a bond with their child is central to the lives of young mothers and constitutes a significant turning point. Maternal identity is a positive label that these women readily embraced. […] Regardless of the age at which maternity occurs, a notable characteristic of mothers who showed resilience was the development of an identity as a competent mother. Indeed, central to the issue of maternal identity is the idea that young mothers do not want to be labeled as “good mothers, considering their age.” Instead, they wanted to show that they met the criteria for a good mother, and they claimed their right to be categorized as good mothers.» (p. 11-12)