''Nature does Things Well, Why Should we Interfere?'': Vaccine Hesitancy Among Mothers

''Nature does Things Well, Why Should we Interfere?'': Vaccine Hesitancy Among Mothers

''Nature does Things Well, Why Should we Interfere?'': Vaccine Hesitancy Among Mothers

''Nature does Things Well, Why Should we Interfere?'': Vaccine Hesitancy Among Motherss

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Référence bibliographique [19531]

Dubé, Ève, Vivion, Maryline, Sauvageau, Chantal, Gagneur, Arnaud, Gagnon, Raymonde et Guay, Maryse. 2016. «''Nature does Things Well, Why Should we Interfere?'': Vaccine Hesitancy Among Mothers ». Qualitative Health Research, vol. 26, no 3, p. 411-425.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
This «qualitative longitudinal study [aims] to better understand how and why mothers in Quebec (Canada) decide to have their newborn vaccinated or not, with a particular focus on vaccine-hesitant mothers.» (p. 412)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur des rencontres avec 55 femmes. Ces dernières ont été rencontrées avant et après l’accouchement.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


In light of the data analysis, authors conclude that «[a]ll mothers interviewed in this study wanted the best protection for their child’s health, and it is essential to understand why this means accepting vaccination for some and refusing or delaying vaccination for others. In between vaccine-favorable and vaccine-unfavorable mothers, vaccine-hesitant mothers formed a heterogeneous group with different levels of indecision and concerns about vaccination. Results of our study have illustrated that, more than a rational “risk versus benefit” analysis, mothers’ decisions encompassed different factors such as social norms, past experiences, emotions, values, social network influences, and other day-to-day concerns about their child’s health and well-being.» (p. 22)