The Placement Trajectories of Youth Served by Child Protection for Sexual Abuse

The Placement Trajectories of Youth Served by Child Protection for Sexual Abuse

The Placement Trajectories of Youth Served by Child Protection for Sexual Abuse

The Placement Trajectories of Youth Served by Child Protection for Sexual Abuses

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Référence bibliographique [19466]

Esposito, Tonino, Delaye, Ashleigh, Chabot, Martin, Trocmé, Nico, Collin-Vézina, Delphine et Simpson, Megan. 2017. «The Placement Trajectories of Youth Served by Child Protection for Sexual Abuse ». Journal of Child and Adolescent Trauma, vol. 10, no 1, p. 63-76.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study […] contributes to the child maltreatment literature by examining the long-term placement trajectories of youth aged 10 to 17 years at initial investigation, with special attention given to the comparative placement trajectories of youth served for CSA [childhood sexual abuse], gender differences, and the mediating effects of behavioral difficulties experienced postinvestigation.» (p. 65)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This study uses a longitudinal research design that draws data from two sources: (1) administrative data from Quebec’s child protection agencies (Esposito et al. 2013, 2014a, b); and, (2) Canadian Census data for the province of Quebec.» (p. 65) «The cohort used for this study consists of 77,579 youth aged 10 to 17 years served for the first time within a child protection jurisdiction between April 1, 2002 and March 31, 2014, of which 6466 youth were served for sexual abuse.» (p. 66)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«At the bivariate level, female youth served for CSA are more likely to be placed but less likely to experience instability compared to male youth served for CSA. However, there is no significant gender effect for youth served for CSA once we account for youth criminality and severe behavioral problems. […] With regards to gendered differences in placement stability, males are often found to exhibit externalizing behavioral problems, such as criminality […]. However, it is interesting that once youth criminality is accounted for, the effect that gender has on placement instability is no longer significant. Youth criminality may account for one of the many complexities that influence the higher male association to externalizing behaviours, those same behaviours leading to negative placement outcomes, and yet may in reality be related to other case characteristics, such as socioeconomic disadvantage and living in high risk family environments that are not specific to CSA.» (p. 73)