How to Support Toddlers’ Autonomy: A Qualitative Study With Child Care Educators

How to Support Toddlers’ Autonomy: A Qualitative Study With Child Care Educators

How to Support Toddlers’ Autonomy: A Qualitative Study With Child Care Educators

How to Support Toddlers’ Autonomy: A Qualitative Study With Child Care Educatorss

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Référence bibliographique [19422]

Côté-Lecaldare, Marilena, Joussemet, Mireille et Dufour, Sarah. 2016. «How to Support Toddlers’ Autonomy: A Qualitative Study With Child Care Educators ». Early Education and Development, vol. 27, no 6, p. 822-840.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The purpose of the present study was thus to explore possible manifestations of AS [autonomy support] toward toddlers. […] Specifically, this research aimed to identify and describe different practices used by child care educators working in childhood day care centers to support the autonomy of toddlers ages 18 to 36 months.» (p. 825)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Eight child care educators took part in the research project to investigate autonomy-supportive practices with toddlers. All participants were women and had received training related to their work as child care educators either at a college level (n=6) or at a university level (n=2) in different recognized programs.» (p. 836) Toutes les participantes travaillaient dans un Centre de la Petite Enfance ou une garderie situé sur dans la région du Grand Montréal.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The qualitative analysis of the interviews revealed 18 practices these child care educators considered supportive of toddlers’ autonomy. They were discussed in the contexts of intrinsic motivation (e.g., play) and internalization (e.g., clean-up time), two important processes in child development and socialization (Ryan & Deci, 2000b). […] In light of these findings, we propose that being supportive of autonomy is a threefold stance. First and foremost, it is a child-oriented personal stance, in which educators genuinely pay attention to toddlers’ signals, try to apprehend them accurately, and use them to guide their responses. Second, it involves engaging in a reciprocal and collaborative relationship with the child. Educators do not establish a one-up/one-down relation with toddlers. Instead, they strive to foster a horizontal, cooperative climate. Third, AS is about considering the child as a full-fledged individual, granting as much importance to toddlers’ reality and experiences as to one’s own.» (p. 833) To collaborate and also create a trusting relationships with the parents appears to be an important part in the educators practices.