Out-of-Home Placement and Regional Variations in Poverty and Health and Social Services Spending: A Multilevel Analysis

Out-of-Home Placement and Regional Variations in Poverty and Health and Social Services Spending: A Multilevel Analysis

Out-of-Home Placement and Regional Variations in Poverty and Health and Social Services Spending: A Multilevel Analysis

Out-of-Home Placement and Regional Variations in Poverty and Health and Social Services Spending: A Multilevel Analysiss

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Référence bibliographique [19397]

Esposito, Tonino, Chabot, Martin, Rothwell, David W., Trocmé, Nico et Delaye, Ashleigh. 2017. «Out-of-Home Placement and Regional Variations in Poverty and Health and Social Services Spending: A Multilevel Analysis ». Children & Youth Services Review, vol. 72, p. 34-43.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study […] contributes to the child maltreatment literature by examining the extent to which regional population-based variations in poverty and health and social services spending impact the risk of placement, after controlling for individual level risk factors risk factors and regional latent differences in delivery of child protection services.» (p. 36)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This study uses a multilevel longitudinal research design that draws date from four sources: (1) longitudinal administrative date from Quebec’s child protection agencies […]; (2) social assistance and family low-income data from Quebec Institute of Statistics (QIS); (3) Canadian Census data; and, (4) intra-province health and social services spending data from the Ministry of Health and Social Services (MHSS).» (p. 36)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Although highly correlated, our results suggest that different forms of economic deprivation – absolute or relative – have differential impact on regional placement risk. Whereas relative poverty does not increase the risk of placement, absolute poverty does for younger children. One possible explanation is that the relatively poor families with children from the additional stress in economically disadvantaged environments. However, the same services do not appear to have the same buffering effect for regions with a high concentration of absolute poverty. Together, these findings suggest a regional differential sensitivity to placement – in that variation in absolute poverty, accounting for per capita health and social services spending – continue to significantly explain why some regions have higher percentage of out-of-home placement for younger children.» (p. 41-42)