Precarious Work in Montreal: Women, Urban Space, and Time

Precarious Work in Montreal: Women, Urban Space, and Time

Precarious Work in Montreal: Women, Urban Space, and Time

Precarious Work in Montreal: Women, Urban Space, and Times

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Référence bibliographique [19351]

Teeple Hopkins, Carmen. 2016. «Precarious Work in Montreal: Women, Urban Space, and Time». Thèse de doctorat, Toronto, University of Toronto.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This dissertation examines the impact of precarious work on women in Montreal.» (p. ii)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Specifically, the dissertation asks how urban space influences precarious work and how time pressures impact experiences of work and home.» (p. ii)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’échantillon est composé de 28 femmes qui habitent Montréal

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


The author reaches three main conclusions. «First, while noting that precarious workers across industries (e.g. art, teaching, service) face housing pressures similar to those experienced by other members of the working class, the research shows that precarious women workers living in central neighbourhoods are especially at risk of being displaced by the middle-class. Second, the project brings important attention to paid and unpaid domestic work. Most research in the field of “time-use” at work focuses on sectors outside the home, even though women have long performed unwaged housework and many women continue to undertake paid employment or self-employment in the home. The dissertation demonstrates the ways in which women’s workloads have increased in the sphere of the home, diminishing their physical health and rendering them more precarious. Third, with reference to women who continue to perform large amounts of unpaid work, the research considers the relevance of historical and contemporary debates around the relationship between paid and unpaid labour, illustrating how women’s wages are negatively impacted by this unpaid work. This dissertation brings together the social dimensions of gender, race, social class, and urban space.» (p. ii-iii)