Marked by Association: Stigma, Marginalisation, Gender and the Families of Male Prisoners in Canada

Marked by Association: Stigma, Marginalisation, Gender and the Families of Male Prisoners in Canada

Marked by Association: Stigma, Marginalisation, Gender and the Families of Male Prisoners in Canada

Marked by Association: Stigma, Marginalisation, Gender and the Families of Male Prisoners in Canadas

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Référence bibliographique [1926]

Hannem, Stacey N. 2008. «Marked by Association: Stigma, Marginalisation, Gender and the Families of Male Prisoners in Canada». Thèse de doctorat, Ottawa, Université de Carlton, Département de sociologie et d’anthropologie.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This is an exploratory study of the impact of incarceration on the families of male prisoners in Canada. The research seeks to examine their experiences in dealing with the incarceration of a loved one and the myriad of social and practical hardships and institutional relationships that result, with particular attention given to the social and institutional regulation that accompanies the status. » (p. 1)

Questions/Hypothèses:
« […] this study was designed to answer the following questions: What key issues or difficulties do prisoners’ families face in dealing with the incarceration of a loved one? What are the practical and social impacts of incarceration on families and how does gender effect these outcomes? How (if at all) does the stigma attached to criminality affect the family member’s experience of negotiating the imprisonment of a loved one in social and institutional settings? How and why do families maintain relationships despite the barriers of imprisonment and involuntary separation? How are families reacted to by the correctional enterprise? What is the impact of gender on family members’ experiences of stigma and their interactions with the correctional system? How do families negotiate the process of release and (re)unification of the family unit following a carceral sentence? What services are available to assist families throughout the process of incarceration and release and what services would best meet the aforementioned needs? How can we understand the experiences of prisoners’ family members within the current Canadian cultural, social and political milieu? » (p. 95-96)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« The findings of this study are based on twenty-six in-depth interviews conducted with family members of Canadian prisoners (n=17) and service providers who work with these families (n=9), and three focus groups with thirteen family members of incarcerated men. » (p. iii) « Among my sample of male prisoners’ family members are wives and female intimate partners (n=15), parents (n=8; four adoptive and four biological, two fathers and six mothers), children (n=2; one son and one daughter) and siblings (n=3; all sisters), ranging in age from mid-twenties to late sixties. The participants describe a wide range of experiences with varying levels of institutional security and in different regions of Canada. The majority of participants (n=15) had loved ones who were incarcerated in Ontario region, while four participants had loved ones incarcerated in Quebec, four in the eastern Canada region and five in western Canada. » (p. 103)

Instruments:
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« This research is an exploratory study of the impacts of incarceration on the families of male prisoners in Canada, the stigma they encounter, the ways stigma is institutionalised, and the gendered nature of these realities. This is the first Canadian study of its kind and takes into account uniquely Canadian aspects of families’ experiences, for example, the geographic dispersal of Canadian penitentiaries and the use of private family visits within prisons. […] This study finds that families experience financial and emotional hardships due to incarceration and that families are often stigmatised and isolated from the community due to their association with a convicted man. Particular attention is given to the financial hardships that result from the geographic dispersal of Canadian prisons and the malign neglect that allows institutional policies on visiting and family contact to unduly burden the families of prisoners. Theoretically, the marginalisation of prisoners’ families and the hardships that they experience are viewed as the outcome of a ''sticky'' stigma that is transferred from the prisoner to his family. This stigma apparently helps justify the social neglect of prisoners’ families and their financial, emotional, and social needs. I also examine the gendered nature of sticky stigma, shown in how patriarchal understandings of family relationships allow stigma to be most easily transferred from men to their partners and families. » (p. iii-iv)