Caregiving Identities of Women with a Brother or Sister with Cerebral Palsy

Caregiving Identities of Women with a Brother or Sister with Cerebral Palsy

Caregiving Identities of Women with a Brother or Sister with Cerebral Palsy

Caregiving Identities of Women with a Brother or Sister with Cerebral Palsys

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Référence bibliographique [1880]

Kuo, Yeh Chen. 2008. «Caregiving Identities of Women with a Brother or Sister with Cerebral Palsy». Thèse de doctorat, Université McGill, Département de service social.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« What is unique to Taiwan is that Confucianism ideals prevalent in Taiwanese culture to this day continue to dictate various roles that women are expected to carry out. As a result, Taiwanese women in contemporary society also experience pressure to keep up with other roles expected of modern career women. Within this context, assuming a role of a caregiver may add a layer of complexity to Taiwanese women’s caregiving identity. Against this social context, this study will specifically focus on the lived experiences of sisters who have a brother or sister with cerebral palsy. » (p. 11-12)

Questions/Hypothèses:
« In order to broaden the knowledge base and provide a comprehensive understanding of Taiwanese women’s caregiving identities, the following research questions will guide the process of inquiry: 1.What are women’s caregiving identities to their brothers or sisters with CP [cerebral palsy] ? 2. How are their caregiving identities constructed in the Taiwanese context? » (p. 13)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
6 femmes thailandaises âgées d’au moins 20 ans ont été interviewées. Elles sont soit la soeur unique d’un frère ou d’une soeur atteint de paralysie cérébrale ou bien la principale personne à s’en occuper.

Instruments:
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


« This study examined the caregiving identities of Taiwanese women who have siblings with cerebral palsy. […]The results of the study suggest that the provision of current and future care to siblings with cerebral palsy [CP] is a complex phenomenon that contributes to how these women view themselves. Caregiving is informed by four processes associated with the provision of care to their siblings: (a) caring through interpretation (b) caring through transformation (c) caring through protection and (d) caring through sacrifice. Engaging in these four processes of providing care to others created unique considerations and tensions in carrying out other roles these women assume in their lives. More specifically, these tensions had to do with their negotiation of relationships with their mothers, considerations pertaining to who they will marry or have already married, the denial of their right to inherit family properties, as well as their desire and expectation to provide ongoing care to their sibling with CP after marriage. In the study, we observed that these women internalized the sexual division of labour in their families and in their culture; they perpetuated the gender system that requires mothers and sisters to engage in family care. Therefore, greater attention must be brought to the promotion of a more equitable sharing of caring tasks by men and women in the family and to the designing and implementing of long-term care policies adapted to the unique characteristics of Taiwanese society. » (p. 1-2)