Trust in Organismic Development, Autonomy Support, and Adaptation among Mothers and their Children

Trust in Organismic Development, Autonomy Support, and Adaptation among Mothers and their Children

Trust in Organismic Development, Autonomy Support, and Adaptation among Mothers and their Children

Trust in Organismic Development, Autonomy Support, and Adaptation among Mothers and their Childrens

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Référence bibliographique [1870]

Landry, Renée, Whipple, Natasha, Mageau, Geneviève, Joussemet, Mireille, Koestner, Richard, DiDio, Lina, Gingras, Isabelle, Bernier, Annie et Haga, Silje Marie. 2008. «Trust in Organismic Development, Autonomy Support, and Adaptation among Mothers and their Children ». Motivation and Emotion, vol. 32, no 3, p. 173-188.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The main purpose of this investigation was to examine the relations of mother’s trust in organismic development to maternal and child outcomes reflecting successful adaptation.» (p. 175)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Study 1: 153 first-time mothers with children under the age of two
Study 2: 62 mothers with young children
Study 3: 116 mothers from Study 1
Study 4: 36 first-time mothers from Norway with children under the age of two

Instruments :
Marlowe-Crowne Social Desirability
Life Orientation Test
Modified version of the NEO-Five Factor Inventory
Infant Characteristics Questionnaire
Modified version of the Parenting Practices Questionnaire
Modified version of the Physical Appearance Comparison Scale (Thompson et al. 1991) and of the Body Comparison Scale
Bayley Scales of Infant Development II (BSID)
Modified version of the Self-Perceptions of the Parental Role instrument
Child Behavior Checklist for ages 1–5
Need Satisfaction Scale

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The current studies examined relations between mothers’ trust in organismic development, autonomy supportive parenting, and adaptation among mothers and their young children. Study 1 showed that trust in organismic development was distinct from optimism, neuroticism, and social desirability whereas it correlated with having relaxed expectations for developmental milestones and making fewer social comparisons about one’s child. Study 2 used observational methods to demonstrate a significant link between trust in organismic development and mothers behaving in an autonomy-supportive rather than controlling manner toward their 1-year-old child during puzzle solving activities. Study 3 used a 1 year prospective design to show that trust in first time mothers was associated with better maternal and child adaptation over time, controlling for initial levels of adaptation and child temperament. Study 4 explored possible social/political antecedents of trust in organismic development by comparing the beliefs of first time mothers from Canada and Norway. The four studies suggest that trust in organismic development fosters autonomy supportive parenting practices and positive maternal and child adaptation. These findings are discussed from the perspective of self-determination theory. » (p. 173)