Mother’s, Father’s Regulation and Child’s Self-Regulation in a Computer-Mediated Learning Situation

Mother’s, Father’s Regulation and Child’s Self-Regulation in a Computer-Mediated Learning Situation

Mother’s, Father’s Regulation and Child’s Self-Regulation in a Computer-Mediated Learning Situation

Mother’s, Father’s Regulation and Child’s Self-Regulation in a Computer-Mediated Learning Situations

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Référence bibliographique [1786]

Nader-Grosbois, Nathalie, Normandeau, Sylvie, Ricard-Cossette, Marcelle et Quintal, Germain. 2008. «Mother’s, Father’s Regulation and Child’s Self-Regulation in a Computer-Mediated Learning Situation ». European Journal of Psychology of Education, vol. 23, no 1, p. 95-115.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
« This study explored the components of triadic interactive self-regulation (as proposed by Zimmerman, 2000) in 7-year-old children, linked with parents’ regulation, and showed the importance of the mutual adjustment in adult-child dyads when they are involved in a computer mediated learning session. » (p.104)

Questions/Hypothèses :
« - HI. Parents’ overall regulation (la) and particularly some specific regulatory strategies (lb) develop during the leaming session, in the sense of a decrease in regulation. H2. Parents’ overall regulation (2a) and particularly some specific regulatory strategies (2b) are linked positively to the child’s performance of the task;
- H3. Children’s overall self-regulation (3a) and specific self-regulatory strategies (3b) develop during the leaming session, in the sense of an increase of self-regulation. H4. Children’s overall self-regulation (4a), and particularly some specific self regulatory strategies (4b) are linked positively to the performance of the task;
- H5: Children’s overall self-regulation is linked negatively with each parents’ overall regulation; the less directive the parents are, the more the children self-regulate (5a). Some specific children’s self-regulatory strategies are linked negatively with parents’ regulatory strategies (in the same category of behaviour) {5b);
- Transversal hypothesis: some differences appear between maternal and paternal strategies of regulation, and in their adjustment toward their children’s self-regulation. » (p. 99)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
« 29 boys aged from 6 ½ to 7 ½ years (M=84 months; SD=3.5) and 33 girls aged from 6 years 3 months to 7 ½ years (M=84 months; SD=4), were examined with their mothers and fathers. » (p. 99)

Instruments :
« Parents filled a questionnaire of general information (age, schooling, job, income). [...] In the laboratory in the presence of each parent, the child had to make two drawings (a house and a butterfly), using LOGO software (Papert, 1981). [...] The performance was recorded by the number of commands used for successful completion of the task. » (pp. 99-100)

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


« This study has explored the parents’ regulation strategies that were more likely to support children’s self-regulation in learning situations with computers. These strategies have been analyzed by means of new grids involving seven categories of behaviour: cognitive strategies relating to identification of objective, exploration of means, attention and evaluation; motivational strategies; and socio-communicative strategies such as joint attention and request. 62 7-year-old children from Quebec families were examined with their mothers and fathers. The children were asked to complete two learning tasks that involved using LOGO software to draw a picture. Results indicated that parents’ regulation varied depending on their gender, a higher directivity was observed in mothers, more specifically through some specific strategies. Analysis of variance on repeated measures showed that, during the session, there was a decrease in the specification of the objective, the initiation of joint attention and of behaviour regulation in parents; and an improvement of the identification of the objective, planning and self-evaluation in children. Correlations between parental regulation and children’s self-regulation strategies indicated positive links concerning strategies relating to joint attention and to motivation; and negative links concerning strategies relating to the exploration of means and evaluation. A good adjustment of the parents’ regulation and the children’s self-regulation correlated positively with success in the task. Methodological implications are proposed for research and psycho-educative intervention. » (p. 95)