Addressing the Interlocking Complexity of Paid Work and Care: Lessons from Changing Family Policy in Quebec

Addressing the Interlocking Complexity of Paid Work and Care: Lessons from Changing Family Policy in Quebec

Addressing the Interlocking Complexity of Paid Work and Care: Lessons from Changing Family Policy in Quebec

Addressing the Interlocking Complexity of Paid Work and Care: Lessons from Changing Family Policy in Quebecs

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Référence bibliographique [17835]

Albanese, Patrizia. 2011. «Addressing the Interlocking Complexity of Paid Work and Care: Lessons from Changing Family Policy in Quebec». Dans A Life in Balance?: Reopening the Family-Work Debate , sous la dir. de Catherine Krull et Sempruch, Justyna, p. 130-143. Vancouver; Toronto: UBC Press.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
L’auteure étudie les politiques familiales au Canada, mais particulièrement celles du Québec afin de voir leurs impacts.

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«In the current global economy, women’s paid work is increasingly necessary for family subsistence. As this is happening, we have also been witness to retrenchment of the welfare state, with women inheriting the global offloading of unpaid care […]. [I]n Canada, the federal government has been withdrawing from previous commitments to childcare, and no governments but Quebec’s seem to have recognized the importance of assisting families, and especially women, with the complexity of balancing paid work and family through a package of reforms and initiatives. Quebec’s policy shifts seem to recognize and take into account the intricate, interdependent, and rich interplay of work and care in the lives of Québécois families, as demonstrated by its introduction of a multi-pronged approach to social policy and service provision. Although Quebec was not always in the forefront of social reform, and in fact was a latecomer to state-funded services, it did much to transform an antiquated system of social support from Catholic paternalism to nationalist pronatalisms to feminist-informed policy and practice. […] In sum, at a time when women’s work – paid and unpaid – has been central to the international drive for cheap and productive labour […], it is high time that the Canadian state contribute, following the Quebec model, to assisting mothers in bearing their disproportionate share of the cost of social reproduction.» (p. 142-143)