Property Disputes Between Separating Common-Law / De Facto Partners

Property Disputes Between Separating Common-Law / De Facto Partners

Property Disputes Between Separating Common-Law / De Facto Partners

Property Disputes Between Separating Common-Law / De Facto Partnerss

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Référence bibliographique [17829]

Hovius, Berend. 2015. «Property Disputes Between Separating Common-Law / De Facto Partners». Dans Gender, Sex and the Law in Canada , sous la dir. de Johanne Elizabeth O’Hanlon, p. 121-204. Toronto: Carswell.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The bulk of the chapter describes the ways in which Canadian jurisdictions have tackled the issue of what law should apply to property disputes between separating common-law partners.» (p. 123)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’auteur utilise des textes de loi et la jurisprudence sur le sujet.

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«Canadian jurisdictions have increasingly imposed obligations on and accorded rights to common-law partners. This has usually occurred in a piecemeal fashion and some jurisdictions have gone further in this direction than others. Quebec has taken the fewest steps along this path and so that even the law of spousal support is applicable only to married and civil union spouses. Other jurisdictions, such as Saskatchewan and Manitoba, have determined that the law governing all of the rights and obligations of married persons should also apply to common-law partners after a specified period of cohabitation. British Columbia has now joined this group. Most Canadian juridictions still fall somewhere between these throw ends of the spec-spousal support, to some unmarried couples, but have kept the statutory family property rules for married persons only.» (p. 190-191) À noter que l’auteur analyse les répercussion de l’affaire Eric v. Lola dans le droit québécois.