Child Sexual Abuse, Sexual Anxiety, and Sexual Satisfaction: The Role of Self-Capacities

Child Sexual Abuse, Sexual Anxiety, and Sexual Satisfaction: The Role of Self-Capacities

Child Sexual Abuse, Sexual Anxiety, and Sexual Satisfaction: The Role of Self-Capacities

Child Sexual Abuse, Sexual Anxiety, and Sexual Satisfaction: The Role of Self-Capacitiess

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Référence bibliographique [17800]

Bigras, Noémie, Godbout, Natacha et Briere, John. 2015. «Child Sexual Abuse, Sexual Anxiety, and Sexual Satisfaction: The Role of Self-Capacities ». Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, vol. 24, no 5, p. 464-483.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he current study examined how CSA [child sexual abuse] and self-capacities variables potentially interrelate to produce sexual difficulties, in this case sexual anxiety and sexual dissatisfaction.» (p. 467)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«We hypothesized that (a) CSA would be associated with less sexual satisfaction and increased sexual anxiety in adulthood, (b) CSA would predict alterations in self-capacities, and (c) childhood sexual abuse would exert some of its influence on sexual problems indirectly, through its relationship with impaired self-capacities.» (p. 467)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were 257 women and 45 men [from the province of Quebec] aged 18 years and older.» (p. 467)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results of this study suggest that CSA has an indirect impact on sexual anxiety and sexual satisfaction through its association with altered self-capacities. Nevertheless, our first hypothesis, that CSA would be directly related to negative sexual outcomes, was not supported. […] Above and beyond sexual disturbance, the [second] hypothesis [...] was confirmed: CSA was linked to all 7 IASC [Inventory of Altered Self-Capacities] scales. […] Our third hypothesis [...] was also supported. Together, these findings suggest that CSA is associated with relational difficulties and decreased self-awareness, which are then related to problems with sexual anxiety and/or decreased sexual satisfaction. The indirect effect of CSA on sexual response through interpersonal difficulties and self-awareness problems may be indicative of an increased risk for insecure attachment following traumatic experiences. […] These findings also suggest that negative interpersonal representations may affect how CSA survivors construe their sexual interactions […], potentially impairing their capacity to experience pleasure from sexual encounters.» (p. 474-475)