Why Us? Perceived Injustice is Associated with More Sexual and Psychological Distress in Couples Coping with Genito-Pelvic Pain

Why Us? Perceived Injustice is Associated with More Sexual and Psychological Distress in Couples Coping with Genito-Pelvic Pain

Why Us? Perceived Injustice is Associated with More Sexual and Psychological Distress in Couples Coping with Genito-Pelvic Pain

Why Us? Perceived Injustice is Associated with More Sexual and Psychological Distress in Couples Coping with Genito-Pelvic Pain s

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Référence bibliographique [17796]

Pâquet, Myriam, Bois, Katy, Rosen, Natalie O., Mayrand, Marie-Hélène, Charbonneau-Lefebvre, Véronique et Bergeron, Sophie. 2016. «Why Us? Perceived Injustice is Associated with More Sexual and Psychological Distress in Couples Coping with Genito-Pelvic Pain ». The Journal of Sexual Medicine, vol. 13, p. 79-87.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The goal of the present study was to investigate perceived injustice among women with PVD [Provoked vestibulodynia] and their partners, and its associations with pain, sexual satisfaction, sexual distress, and depression.» (p. 80)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«We hypothesized that women’s lower perceived injustice would be associated with higher levels of sexual satisfaction and lower levels of pain, sexual distress, and depression. Moreover, we hypothesized that partners’ lower perceived injustice would be associated with women’s higher levels of sexual satisfaction and lower levels of pain, sexual distress, and depression.» (p. 80)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur la participation de 50 femmes et de leur partenaire.

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


Results showed that «[w]omen who reported higher perceived injustice reported greater sexual distress and depression [and that] partners who reported higher perceived injustice also reported greater sexual distress and depression, and lower sexual satisfaction. […] Consistent with our hypothesis, women’s and partners’ perceived injustice were both correlated with greater levels of their own sexual distress. Considering that sexual distress is a deleterious consequence associated with PVD, identifying a factor that might protect this dimension of sexuality is important for women who experience painful sex and for their partners. […] Further, consistent with our hypothesis, women’s and partners’ perceived injustice were both correlated with their own greater depressive symptoms. Empirical studies have emphasized the repercussions of loss in the development and maintenance of depressive symptoms. For women with PVD and their partners, appraisals of their loss of ability to engage in “normal” sexual activities (eg, having sexual intercourse without pain) seems to be a central aspect of their perception of injustice. [Results also showed that] partners’ perceived injustice was significantly associated with their own lower sexual satisfaction. This finding suggests that the experience of injustice related to women’s genito-pelvic pain is more relevant for partners’ own sexual satisfaction than it is for women.» (p. 83-84)