The Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Marital Therapy on Marital Happiness and Problem Solving Self-Appraisal

The Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Marital Therapy on Marital Happiness and Problem Solving Self-Appraisal

The Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Marital Therapy on Marital Happiness and Problem Solving Self-Appraisal

The Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Marital Therapy on Marital Happiness and Problem Solving Self-Appraisals

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Référence bibliographique [17786]

Bélanger, Claude, Laporte, Lise, Sabourin, Stéphane et Wright, John. 2015. «The Effect of Cognitive-Behavioral Group Marital Therapy on Marital Happiness and Problem Solving Self-Appraisal ». American Journal of Family Therapy, vol. 43, no 2, p. 103-118.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he main purpose of this paper is 1) to evaluate the overall effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy in bringing about positive changes in marital satisfaction and 2) to study the effects of such a program on partners’ self-appraisal of problem solving abilities.» (p. 106)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The specific hypotheses were that group marital therapy subjects would report changes in a) their marital satisfaction; b) the overall appraisal of their problem solving abilities; c) their problem solving confidence; d) their approach to problem solving activities; and e) their strategies to control their behavior when they try to solve a problem.» (p. 106)

2. Méthode

s
Échantillon/Matériau :
«Sixty-six French-Canadian couples participated in the study.» (p. 106)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results of this study generally support the hypothesis that couples’ marital happiness increases significantly following participation in cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy (Baucom, Epstein, Kirby & LaTaillade, 2010; Butler, Chapman, Forman, & Beck, 2006). […] The results also suggest that the program helped couples improve their marital adjustment independently of how they initially appraised their problem solving abilities. However, the results indicate that cognitive-behavioral group marital therapy had a differential effect on the improvement of self-perceived problem solving capacities depending on the sex of the participant and on the initial self-appraisal of his/her problem solving abilities. [The] results suggest that cognitive-behavioral marital therapy should include cognitive strategies targeting self-appraisal of problem solving activities if and only if spouses appraise themselves as ineffective problem solvers before the beginning of the intervention. With partners who appraise themselves as effective problem solvers, this strategy would not be pertinent, and other targets should be identified during the initial assessment.» (p. 113-114)