Maternal and Paternal Satisfaction in the Delivery Room: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Study

Maternal and Paternal Satisfaction in the Delivery Room: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Study

Maternal and Paternal Satisfaction in the Delivery Room: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Study

Maternal and Paternal Satisfaction in the Delivery Room: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Studys

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Référence bibliographique [17667]

Bélanger-Lévesque, Marie-Noëlle, Pasquier, Marilou, Roy-Matton, Naomé, Blouin, Simon et Pasquier, Jean-Charles. 2014. «Maternal and Paternal Satisfaction in the Delivery Room: A Cross-Sectional Comparative Study ». BMJ Open, vol. 4, no 2, p. 1-7.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Maternal satisfaction during the birthing process has been well documented, whereas little is known about the fathers’ birth experiences. Our objective was to evaluate and compare the birth satisfaction of mothers and fathers.» (p. 1)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur la participation de 200 mères et de 200 mères/pères accompagnants lors de l’accouchement. Les participants ont été recrutés au Centre hospitalier universitaire de Sherbrooke (CHUS).

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Global satisfaction scores for mothers […] and fathers […] were relatively high and similar […]. The analysis of subthemes showed that more distress during childbirth was reported by mothers […], while less support […] and care satisfaction […] were reported by fathers. The use of epidural anaesthesia during vaginal birth was the sole concordant lower satisfaction predictor. For mothers, other satisfaction predictors were labour length, tearing and type of anaesthesia used in caesarean section. For fathers, lower satisfaction predictors were instrumental delivery, primary caesarean delivery and infant’s distress factors after caesarean section. This study highlights differences in mothers’ and fathers’ birth satisfaction and in their predictors. It is thus important to take into account the birth experience of each parent and to support parents accordingly by adapting care provision surrounding childbirth. More research on this topic from the prenatal to the postnatal period is suggested, as it might have an impact on parents’ satisfaction and on early parenthood experience.» (p. 1)