Quality Determinants of Services for Parents of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Quality Determinants of Services for Parents of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Quality Determinants of Services for Parents of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

Quality Determinants of Services for Parents of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorderss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [17634]

Rivard, Mélina, Lépine, Anabel, Mercier, Céline et Morin, Marjorie. 2015. «Quality Determinants of Services for Parents of Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders ». Journal of Child & Family Studies, vol. 24, no 8, p. 2388-2397.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study investigated how parents of young children with an ASD [autism spectrum disorders] perceive the quality determinants of services provided within the context of a public network.» (p. 2392)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The parents of 179 children (including two twins and three triplets) with ASD participated in the study. These 176 families had received, or were receiving, specialized services from a rehabilitation center over a period of at least 1 year. […] The study took place in the province of Québec in Canada […].» (p. 2389-2390)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


According to the authors, «[p]arents felt that the accessibility, continuity, and flexibility of services were the most important determinants of quality. Differences between the frequencies with which each of these three determinants were mentioned were so slight that we conclude that parents value these aspects equally. This indicates that parents of young children require easily accessible, seamless, and fluid services in the early stages of their trajectory within ASD services and as their situation evolves over time. […] Another notable aspect of our findings was that two out of the three determinants of quality deemed most important by families, continuity and accessibility, were also perceived as being the least realized in the services they had received. […] Parents’ perception of a lack of continuity and accessibility, along with their lower satisfaction levels for these determinants, reflect some of the challenges to the effectiveness of the integrated care model and the model trajectory currently guiding users’ experiences within the network of services.» (p. 2393)