Flying Blind: Sources of Distress for Family Caregivers of Palliative Cancer Patients Managing Pain at Home

Flying Blind: Sources of Distress for Family Caregivers of Palliative Cancer Patients Managing Pain at Home

Flying Blind: Sources of Distress for Family Caregivers of Palliative Cancer Patients Managing Pain at Home

Flying Blind: Sources of Distress for Family Caregivers of Palliative Cancer Patients Managing Pain at Homes

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Référence bibliographique [17526]

Mehta, Anita, Chan, Lisa S. et Cohen, S. Robin. 2014. «Flying Blind: Sources of Distress for Family Caregivers of Palliative Cancer Patients Managing Pain at Home ». Journal of Psychosocial Oncology, vol. 32, no 1, p. 94-111.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The purpose of this article is to highlight the sources of distress experienced by family caregivers managing pain at home and discuss clinical implications.» (p. 97)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«This article is based on the secondary analysis of interview and field note data collected by Mehta and colleagues (2010).» (p. 97) «Participants were a purposive sample of 24 family caregivers who were identified by the patients as the person most involved in the management of their pain […].» (p. 98)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«This study highlighted the fact that caregivers managing a family member’s pain at home felt stress, anxiety, helplessness, and frustration specifically related to their efforts at pain control. As a result, they were often overwhelmed with the pain management responsibility. When the patient was in a pain crisis they sometimes wished death would come and then felt guilty for the thought. The findings from this study reinforce previous reports that family caregivers of cancer patients are at risk for caregiver burden, and subsequently psychosocial consequences such as distress, anxiety, and depression (Flaskerud et al., 2000; Mehta & Hamel, 2011; Miaskowski et al., 1997; Yates et al., 2004). It further adds to the body of work that underscores the fact symptom management, and in particular pain management, remains one of the most distressing responsibilities for the family caregiver. In addition, it brings to light the unique context of the home environment, and thus several sources of distress that emerge from the challenges of managing pain outside of a health care institution. This underlines the fact that there is a need for health care providers to assess how family caregivers are managing each source of distress and to provide the necessary support.» (p. 104-105)