Psychosocial Profile of Children Having Participated in an Intervention Program for Their Sexual Behavior Problems: The Predictor Role of Maltreatment

Psychosocial Profile of Children Having Participated in an Intervention Program for Their Sexual Behavior Problems: The Predictor Role of Maltreatment

Psychosocial Profile of Children Having Participated in an Intervention Program for Their Sexual Behavior Problems: The Predictor Role of Maltreatment

Psychosocial Profile of Children Having Participated in an Intervention Program for Their Sexual Behavior Problems: The Predictor Role of Maltreatments

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Référence bibliographique [17509]

Tougas, Anne-Marie, Boisvert, Isabelle, Tourigny, Marc, Lemieux, Annie, Tremblay, Claudia et Gagnon, Mélanie M. 2016. «Psychosocial Profile of Children Having Participated in an Intervention Program for Their Sexual Behavior Problems: The Predictor Role of Maltreatment ». Journal of Child Sexual Abuse, vol. 25, no 2, p. 127-141.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The aim of the present study, therefore, is to explore whether a history of maltreatment, as experienced by a child or a parent, may help predict the psychosocial profiles of children from the perspective of their behavioral difficulties and sexualized behaviors at the end of an intervention program aimed at treating SBPs [sexual behavior problems].» (p. 129)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The study used a longitudinal research design where data were collected from 76 children (55 boys and 21 girls) displaying SBPs as well as from their 76 parents (65 women and 11 men) at the beginning and the end of their participation in the Intervention Program for Children Displaying Sexual Behavior Problems [in the province of Quebec].» (p. 130)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


First, these results «indicate that exposure to inadequate or coercive educational practices can help perpetuate SBPs. Second, they support the consideration of types of maltreatment other than sexual abuse in the prevention and treatment of SBPs. […] The results indicating that the children of a parent who had experienced sexual abuse display fewer sexual behaviors at the outset of the intervention program suggest that the latter is well suited for these families. A first interpretation lies in the nature of content and activities likely to benefit parents who were victims of sexual abuse. For instance, sex education may help these parents improve their knowledge of sexuality and even correct erroneous information they may have with regard to sexuality because of their experiences of sexual abuse. Moreover, discussing sexuality in the context of the program may help parents who were victims of sexual abuse feel more comfortable discussing the topic more openly with their children, despite the fact that it may evoke a difficult personal experience. […] Finally, if the majority of the participating children complete the intervention program with a similar profile, this does not mean that their difficulties have been surmounted. […] Ultimately, the results of this study show that the intervention program does not resolve all difficulties experienced by the participating children and suggest that adding an intervention module that focuses on trauma could lead to even more significant improvements with regard to SBPs.» (p. 136-138)