Girls in Residential Care: From Child Maltreatment to Trauma-Related Symptoms in Emerging Adulthood

Girls in Residential Care: From Child Maltreatment to Trauma-Related Symptoms in Emerging Adulthood

Girls in Residential Care: From Child Maltreatment to Trauma-Related Symptoms in Emerging Adulthood

Girls in Residential Care: From Child Maltreatment to Trauma-Related Symptoms in Emerging Adulthoods

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Référence bibliographique [17508]

Van Vugt, Eveline, Lanctot, Nadine, Paquette, Geneviève, Collin-Vezina, Delphine et Lemieux, Annie. 2014. «Girls in Residential Care: From Child Maltreatment to Trauma-Related Symptoms in Emerging Adulthood ». Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 38, no 1, p. 114-122.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Our study sought to better understand the associations between child abuse and neglect, conduct problems, and traumarelated symptoms among young women formerly in residential care.» (p. 115)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The present study is part of a larger longitudinal study conducted among 182 female adolescents placed in residential care in Montreal, Canada, in 2007–2008.» (p. 116)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Findings indicated that the young women in our sample were exposed to different types of child maltreatment and that these maltreatment experiences were associated with trauma related symptoms in emerging adulthood. More specifically, emotional abuse and emotional neglect were strongly associated with young womens’ anxiety, depression and anger. […] The strongest link was found for emotional abuse and trauma related symptoms in emerging adulthood. [...] For instance, McGee et al. (1997) observed that psychological maltreatment uniquely contributed to the prediction of self-reported internalizing problems in female adolescents within in the child protection system, even after controlling for contextual variables. Gibb, Benas, Crossett, and Uhrlass (2007), linked child emotional abuse by parents to a cognitive vulnerability to depression. Emotional abuse by parents affected both positive and negative thoughts in young adults, in that they displayed lower levels of positive thoughts and higher levels of negative thoughts. Because lower levels of positive thoughts were uniquely related to parental emotional abuse (and not to other forms of victimization), the authors suggested that the development of positive thoughts may have already been affected by parents negative communication styles early in childhood. In addition, a study by Edwards et al. (2003) observed that the presence of emotional abuse, on its own, increased the level of mental health problem in a group of adults.» (p. 117)