Child Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Relational and Personal Functioning: The Role of Parental Support

Child Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Relational and Personal Functioning: The Role of Parental Support

Child Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Relational and Personal Functioning: The Role of Parental Support

Child Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Relational and Personal Functioning: The Role of Parental Supports

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Référence bibliographique [17489]

Godbout, Natacha, Briere, John, Sabourin, Stéphane et Lussier, Yvan. 2014. «Child Sexual Abuse and Subsequent Relational and Personal Functioning: The Role of Parental Support ». Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 38, no 2, p. 317-325.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In the present study, we compared four groups of individuals (CSA [child sexual abuse] survivors with perceived parental support, survivors without perceived parental support, survivors who reported that their parent(s) were unaware of the abuse, and nonsurvivors) on their relational and psychological adjustment as adults.» (p. 318)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The sample (N = 348) consisted of 153 men and 195 women who were in couple relationships, either married (n = 103) or cohabiting (n = 245) with their partner.» (p. 318)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results of this study suggest that, to some extent, perceived parental support counteracts negative outcomes and foster healthier intrapersonal and interpersonal adjustment in CSA survivors, perhaps through the development of positive internal working models of self and other. As compared to other groups, survivors with unsupportive parent(s) reported more abandonment anxiety and psychological distress. However, CSA survivors with supportive parent(s) presented levels of adjustment similar to that of the nonabused group on abandonment anxiety, psychological, and couple distress. Moreover, sexually abused participants who reported that their parent(s) intervened when they learned about the crime also reported more comfort with intimacy in comparison with all other groups, including nonsurvivors. […] As hypothesized, survivors with supportive parents expressed lower avoidant attachment, not only in comparison to those with unsupportive parents and those reporting their nonabusive parents were unaware of their abuse, but also compared to non-abused participants. This positive effect of parental support in the aftermath of a sexual abuse potentially highlights the healing effect of a positive attachment figure in traumatic situations. The child may learn that his or her attachment figures were reliable and worth of trust in a critical situation, where the child was particularly vulnerable, leading to the view that significant others might be present and trustworthy in the future, even in stressful situations.» (p. 322)