Identity and Relatedness as Mediators Between Child Emotional Abuse and Adult Couple Adjustment in Women

Identity and Relatedness as Mediators Between Child Emotional Abuse and Adult Couple Adjustment in Women

Identity and Relatedness as Mediators Between Child Emotional Abuse and Adult Couple Adjustment in Women

Identity and Relatedness as Mediators Between Child Emotional Abuse and Adult Couple Adjustment in Womens

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Référence bibliographique [17486]

Bigras, Noémie, Godbout, Natacha, Hébert, Martine, Runtz, Marsha et Daspe, Marie-Ève. 2015. «Identity and Relatedness as Mediators Between Child Emotional Abuse and Adult Couple Adjustment in Women ». Child Abuse & Neglect, vol. 50, p. 85-93.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[T]he goal of this study is to examine the specific role of CEA [childhood emotional abuse] in an integrative model of intrapersonal (identity) and interpersonal (interpersonal conflicts) variables to explain women’s couple adjustment in adulthood.» (p. 87)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were 184 women from a Francophone sample of the general population of Quebec who were over the age of 18 and involved in an intimate relationship for at least six months.» (p. 87)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Results […] indicate that CEA contributes to a greater sense of impaired identity and more interpersonal conflicts, which in turn are associated with poorer couple adjustment. Specifically, path analyses showed full mediation of the relation between CEA and women’s report of couple adjustment through the hypothesized mediators. Our findings are consistent with the conclusions of Perry et al. (2007), who observed that CEA is associated with later relationship dissatisfaction in adulthood. This is also consistent with prior research suggesting that child maltreatment, including emotional abuse, is associated with relationship dysfunction in women survivors (Colman & Widom, 2004) and with intimacy problems (DiLillo et al., 2007; Mullen, Martin, Anderson, Romans, & Herbison, 1996). As suggested by Briere and Scott (2014), childhood maltreatment may prevent a child from developing adaptive strategies to cope with one’s past adverse relationships. Hence, it might jeopardize the survivor’s ability to fulfill normal developmental tasks such as the consolidation of one’s identity, and the ability to form and maintain significant relationships with others in adulthood.» (p. 90)