Socioeconomic and Psychosocial Adversity in Inuit Mothers during the First Postpartum Year

Socioeconomic and Psychosocial Adversity in Inuit Mothers during the First Postpartum Year

Socioeconomic and Psychosocial Adversity in Inuit Mothers during the First Postpartum Year

Socioeconomic and Psychosocial Adversity in Inuit Mothers during the First Postpartum Years

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Référence bibliographique [17476]

Fortin, Stéphanie, Jacobson, Sandra W., Gagnon, Jocelyne, Forget-Dubois, Nadine, Dionne, Ginette, Jacobson, Joseph L. et Muckle, Gina. 2014. «Socioeconomic and Psychosocial Adversity in Inuit Mothers during the First Postpartum Year ». Journal of Aboriginal Health, p. 63-75.

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Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This study, part of the ECCD [Environmental Contaminants and Child Development] study, aims to describe the adversity faced by Inuit mothers from Nunavik during the first postpartum year, a positive but stressful period of transition that is important for early child development and mother-child bonding.» (p. 66)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The sample consisted of 176 women who participated in the ECCD study […], which was conducted in the three largest communities (Puvirnituq, Inukjuaq, and Kuujjuaraapik) of Nunavik between November 1995 and March 2002.» (p. 66)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Our results show many mothers struggled with socioeconomic and psychosocial difficulties during this period. We found the prevalence rates of these difficulties in our study to be similar to those reported by women of childbearing age in the 2004 Nunavik Inuit Health Survey (Qanuippitaa). Rates of psychological distress, lifetime history of suicide attempts, and substance use, however, were higher in our study. The higher rate of distress might be due to being interviewed during the postpartum months, a period well-recognized to be high-risk for maternal depression. Differences in prevalence rates between Qanuippitaa and our study may also be due to sample differences between studies: the Qanuippitaa sample included 27% of the entire adult population of the region, with households selected to be representative of the population. […] In addition, prevalence rates reported in this study corroborate the established disparities between Aboriginal Peoples and the general Canadian population. […] In addition to the personal and marital adjustment related to the birth of a child, many Inuit mothers have to deal with stressful psychosocial and socioeconomic difficulties likely to challenge their adaptation and well-being. […] Our results showed moderate relationships among psychosocial risk factors, especially between domestic abuse and distress indicators.» (p. 71)