Exploring Resilience and Borderline Personality Disorder: A Qualitative Study of Pairs of Sisters

Exploring Resilience and Borderline Personality Disorder: A Qualitative Study of Pairs of Sisters

Exploring Resilience and Borderline Personality Disorder: A Qualitative Study of Pairs of Sisters

Exploring Resilience and Borderline Personality Disorder: A Qualitative Study of Pairs of Sisterss

| Ajouter

Référence bibliographique [17398]

Paris, Joel, Perlin, Jewel, Laporte, Lise, Fitzpatrick, Marilyn et Destefano, Jack. 2014. «Exploring Resilience and Borderline Personality Disorder: A Qualitative Study of Pairs of Sisters ». Personality and Mental Health, vol. 8, no 3, p. 199-208.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The present study aims to examine some mechanisms of resilience in women whose childhood history put them at risk for developing BPD [borderline personality disorder].» (p. 199)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The study included 12 pairs of [french-speaking] sisters who were chosen because they were discordant for psychopathology (one sister with BPD and one sister with no current psychopathology) and matched on comparable reported experiences of severe abuse and neglect (type of abuse or neglect experienced, and severity and chronicity of maltreatment).» (p. 200-201)

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«As expected, the non-BPD sisters recounted having more individual, familial and external protective factors than their sisters with BPD. In addition to providing support and elaboration for these three categories, the data revealed how two novel factors, acceptance of the past and the meaning of having children, could also contribute to resilience. Non-BPD sisters reported several individual factors (individual characteristics, emotional regulatory skills and future time orientation) that have been identified in the literature as important protective factors related to resilience […]. The non-BPD sisters’ narratives suggest that they had less difficulty with their emotional reactions and a capacity to manage negative emotional experiences. […] The non-BPD sisters described familial protective factors related to the importance of distancing themselves from their abusive childhood. They needed to separate from their dysfunctional families to create structure and stability in their lives. […] External support networks (adult and peer relationships) were important features for the non-BPD sisters’ outcomes. Most of these sisters were able to identify one or more people whom they saw as concerned, supportive and nurturing when they were children and reported that these people were critical to their development.» (p. 205-206)