Associations Between Mother-Child Relationship Quality and Adolescent Adjustment: Using a Genetically Controlled Design to Determine the Direction and Magnitude of Effects

Associations Between Mother-Child Relationship Quality and Adolescent Adjustment: Using a Genetically Controlled Design to Determine the Direction and Magnitude of Effects

Associations Between Mother-Child Relationship Quality and Adolescent Adjustment: Using a Genetically Controlled Design to Determine the Direction and Magnitude of Effects

Associations Between Mother-Child Relationship Quality and Adolescent Adjustment: Using a Genetically Controlled Design to Determine the Direction and Magnitude of Effectss

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Référence bibliographique [17268]

Guimond, Fanny-Alexandre, Laursen, Brett, Vitaro, Frank, Brendgen, Mara, Dionne, Ginette et Boivin, Michel. 2016. «Associations Between Mother-Child Relationship Quality and Adolescent Adjustment: Using a Genetically Controlled Design to Determine the Direction and Magnitude of Effects ». International Journal of Behavioral Development, vol. 40, no 3, p. 196-204.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«Two goals guided our research. First, we examine parent-driven and child-driven effects to address over-time associations between perceived relationship quality with mothers and adolescent maladjustment. […] Second, we sought to determine the degree to which gene–environment correlations inflated previous results describing parent-driven and child-driven effects.» (p. 197)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«The 163 MZ [monozygotic] same-sex twin pairs (85 female pairs, 78 male pairs) participating in this investigation were part of the Quebec Newborn Twin Study, an ongoing longitudinal study of a population-based sample of twins born between 1995 and 1998 in the greater Montreal area (Boivin et al., 2013).» (p. 197)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results revealed child-driven associations between adolescent depressive symptoms and perceived maternal support, as well as between adolescent delinquent behaviors and perceived maternal negativity. These findings emerge in both genetically controlled and non-genetically controlled analyses, indicating that these effects are not an artifact of rGE [gene-environment correlations]. In contrast, only the nongenetically controlled design revealed parent-driven associations between adolescent delinquent behaviors and perceived maternal negativity. […] The child-driven effects between adolescent depressive symptoms and perceived maternal support indicate that higher initial levels of depressive symptoms predict greater subsequent decreases in perceived maternal support. […] We also found child-driven effects in the association between adolescent delinquent behaviors and maternal negativity such that greater initial level of behavior problems predicted greater subsequent increases in perceived maternal negativity.» (p. 200-201)