Marital Satisfaction and Quality of Father-Child Interactions: The Moderating Role of Child Gender

Marital Satisfaction and Quality of Father-Child Interactions: The Moderating Role of Child Gender

Marital Satisfaction and Quality of Father-Child Interactions: The Moderating Role of Child Gender

Marital Satisfaction and Quality of Father-Child Interactions: The Moderating Role of Child Genders

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Référence bibliographique [17264]

Bernier, Annie, Jarry-Boileau, Véronique et Lacharite, Carl. 2014. «Marital Satisfaction and Quality of Father-Child Interactions: The Moderating Role of Child Gender ». The Journal of Genetic Psychology, vol. 175, no 1-2, p. 105-117.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This article [aims] to investigate the link between fathers’ marital satisfaction and the observed quality of their interactions with their child at a critical time for the unfolding of paternal caregiving behavior, toddlerhood.» (p. 111)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Sixty-three father–child dyads (37 girls and 26 boys) living in a large Canadian metropolitan area participated in this study.» (p. 108) L’étude prend place dans la province de Québec.

Instruments :
- Questionnaires
- Grille d’observation

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The results suggested that, contrary to expectations, fathers’ marital satisfaction did not relate to the quality of their interactions with their toddler as rated by external observers. Moderation analyses revealed, however, that this link did exist, but only among fathers of boys, for whom marital satisfaction was reliably and positively associated with the quality of their interactive behavior with their son. In contrast, the same relation was near zero among fathers of girls. These findings build on scant evidence that father-son relationships may be more vulnerable to marital difficulties than father-daughter relationships, which had been observed before in extreme cases such as overt marital conflict and violence (Jouriles & Norwood, 1995; Kaczynski et al., 2006), or when considering fathers’ own perceptions of their parenting (Sturge-Apple et al., 2004).» (p. 112)