Where Fathers Fit in Quebec’s Perinatal Health Care Services System and What They Need

Where Fathers Fit in Quebec’s Perinatal Health Care Services System and What They Need

Where Fathers Fit in Quebec’s Perinatal Health Care Services System and What They Need

Where Fathers Fit in Quebec’s Perinatal Health Care Services System and What They Needs

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Référence bibliographique [17263]

Gervais, Christine, de Montigny, Francine, Lacharité, Carl et St-Arneault, Kate. 2016. «Where Fathers Fit in Quebec’s Perinatal Health Care Services System and What They Need ». Psychology of Men & Masculinity, vol. 17, no 2, p. 126-136.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«The objective of this exploratory study was to explore fathers’ needs during the perinatal period, focusing especially on the place they occupy in perinatal health care providers and services’ concerns, objectives, strategies, and actions.» (p. 126)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«The objective of the present study was thus to answer two research questions: [...] Where do fathers fit within the observations, concerns, and actions of perinatal health care providers, according to parents’ perceptions and the analysis of institutional documents? [...] What are fathers’ needs in terms of services and formal support during the perinatal period?» (p. 127-128)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
L’étude est basée sur la participation de 17 couples attendant un enfant ou qui ont un enfant de moins de deux ans. Les auteurs ont aussi utilisé de la documentation provenant de divers établissements de santé.

Instruments :
Guide d’entretien semi-directif

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse de contenu

3. Résumé


«The interviews revealed a perceived dynamic in which the father has a duty to support his partner. This dynamic, which we can only hypothesize already existed in the couple, was reinforced by services delivered to the couple in the prenatal period. […] During the perinatal period, several fathers had doubts about the legitimacy of their experiences and needs. These fathers felt they were not entitled to receive services from professionals since they considered that their partners’ needs had priority. […] The participants’ accounts of the relationship between fathers and health care providers revealed many subtle points. The fathers’ experiences of contact with health care providers were described along a continuum of need for recognition. At one end of the continuum, some fathers felt welcomed and supported, whereas, at the other, they felt excluded from relationships with health care providers, invisible, as if they were not experiencing anything and were simply witnesses to the events.» (p. 129-130) «The parents’ perceptions that there was little space for fathers in services were much more consistent and revealed another continuum of perceptions, ranging from a vision of services as being only for mothers to an impression that services were unfriendly to fathers.» (p. 132)