Examining the Interface of Children’s Sleep, Executive Functioning, and Caregiving Relationships: A Plea Against Silos in the Study of Biology, Cognition, and Relationships

Examining the Interface of Children’s Sleep, Executive Functioning, and Caregiving Relationships: A Plea Against Silos in the Study of Biology, Cognition, and Relationships

Examining the Interface of Children’s Sleep, Executive Functioning, and Caregiving Relationships: A Plea Against Silos in the Study of Biology, Cognition, and Relationships

Examining the Interface of Children’s Sleep, Executive Functioning, and Caregiving Relationships: A Plea Against Silos in the Study of Biology, Cognition, and Relationshipss

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Référence bibliographique [17261]

Bernier, Annie, Matte-Gagné, Célia et Bouvette-Turcot, Andrée-Anne. 2014. «Examining the Interface of Children’s Sleep, Executive Functioning, and Caregiving Relationships: A Plea Against Silos in the Study of Biology, Cognition, and Relationships ». Current Directions in Psychological Science, vol. 23, no 4, p. 284-289.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[O]ur ongoing longitudinal study examines different forms of direct and indirect associations among young children’s sleep, their executive functioning, and their caregiving relationships.» (p. 284) L’article résume les résultats de cette étude et d’autres études similaires.

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Données documentaires diverses

Type de traitement des données :
Réflexion critique

3. Résumé


«[Some] reports suggest that […] (a) higher-quality parenting and more secure motherchild attachment relate to better child conflict EF [executive functioning], and (b) higher-quality parenting also relates to better child impulse control, but only among more vulnerable children, namely those living in lower-SES homes and those with more difficult temperaments.» (p. 285) «[O]ur work joins that of other teams (see El-Sheikh, 2011) in suggesting that young children’s sleep, while undoubtedly dependent on neural maturation, may be impacted by different aspects of the family environment, such as parental psychological adjustment, parenting, and mother-child attachment security. Given that these family factors relate to child EF as well, the question naturally came up as to whether child sleep and EF might be interrelated.» (p. 286)