Concordance Between the Quality of Maternal and Paternal Parenting Behavior within Couples

Concordance Between the Quality of Maternal and Paternal Parenting Behavior within Couples

Concordance Between the Quality of Maternal and Paternal Parenting Behavior within Couples

Concordance Between the Quality of Maternal and Paternal Parenting Behavior within Coupless

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Référence bibliographique [17256]

Deschênes, Marie, Bernier, Annie, Jarry-Boileau, Véronique et St-Laurent, Diane. 2014. «Concordance Between the Quality of Maternal and Paternal Parenting Behavior within Couples ». The Journal of Genetic Psychology, vol. 175, no 4, p. 346-362.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«We aimed to examine the concordance between the quality of maternal and paternal behavior during independent dyadic parent–child interactions, and to investigate variation in this concordance according to three factors: child sex, presence or absence of siblings, and family SES [socioeconomic status].» (p. 350-351)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants in the present study were 74 intact families (child, father, and mother) living in a large Canadian metropolitan area. […] The majority of mothers (60.3%) and fathers (56.1%) had a college degree, were Caucasian (91.9% of mothers and 87.8% of fathers), and French speaking (83.8% of mothers and 78.4% of fathers).» (p. 351)

Instruments :
Questionnaire

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«As expected and in line with previous studies (e.g., Aksan et al., 2006; Barnett et al., 2008; Russell & Russell, 1994), the concordance between the quality of mothers’ and fathers’ interactive behavior was moderate. […] The moderate mother–father concordance found here, across developmental periods and assessments, speaks to the robustness of the association between the quality of maternal and paternal behaviors within intact couples.» (p. 354-355) «As expected, the concordance between mothers and fathers was significantly greater when interacting with a boy than a girl. As mentioned in the introduction, this could be due to fathers’ greater involvement with their sons than daughters (Shannon et al., 2006). This phenomenon could be exacerbated by maternal gatekeeping, which is defined as a mother’s attempts to encourage (gate open) or to undermine (gate closed) father’s involvement toward children (Cannon, Schoppe-Sullivan, Mangelsdorf, & Brown, 2008). If some mothers believe that their baby boy needs his father’s presence more so than a baby girl, this would decrease maternal gatekeeping, thereby favoring paternal involvement and thus opportunity for mutual influences between parents.» (p. 356)