Parental Autonomy Support and Honesty: The Mediating Role of Identification with the Honesty Value and Perceived Costs and Benefits of Honesty

Parental Autonomy Support and Honesty: The Mediating Role of Identification with the Honesty Value and Perceived Costs and Benefits of Honesty

Parental Autonomy Support and Honesty: The Mediating Role of Identification with the Honesty Value and Perceived Costs and Benefits of Honesty

Parental Autonomy Support and Honesty: The Mediating Role of Identification with the Honesty Value and Perceived Costs and Benefits of Honestys

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Référence bibliographique [17254]

Bureau, Julien S. et Mageau, Geneviève A. 2014. «Parental Autonomy Support and Honesty: The Mediating Role of Identification with the Honesty Value and Perceived Costs and Benefits of Honesty ». Journal of Adolescence, vol. 37, no 3, p. 225-236.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«In light of the importance of adolescents’ honesty (or absence of lies), the present research draws on Self-determination Theory (SDT; Deci & Ryan, 1985, 2000) to address what parents can do to encourage honesty from their early adolescents.» (p. 225)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
«Participants were 174 French-speaking adolescent/parent dyads from the province of Quebec (53 male/mother dyads, 23 male/father dyads, 82 female/mother dyads, and 16 female/father dyads).» (p. 228)

Instruments :
Questionnaires

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«The present research shows that parental autonomy support leads to more adolescents’ honesty while controlling parenting predicts less adolescents’ honesty. Results also show that this effect is mediated by adolescents’ identification with the honesty value and by perceived high benefits and low costs of honesty. More precisely, results showed that the more parents are perceived as autonomy supportive the more adolescents report high benefits of telling the truth and high costs of lying to them. In contrast, the more parents adopt controlling behaviors the more adolescents report high costs of telling the truth.» (p. 233)