Who has autonomy? The impact of immigration, gender and welfare state policy on the lives of immigrant women

Who has autonomy? The impact of immigration, gender and welfare state policy on the lives of immigrant women

Who has autonomy? The impact of immigration, gender and welfare state policy on the lives of immigrant women

Who has autonomy? The impact of immigration, gender and welfare state policy on the lives of immigrant womens

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Référence bibliographique [1679]

Skinner, Suzanne. 2008. «Who has autonomy? The impact of immigration, gender and welfare state policy on the lives of immigrant women». Mémoire de maîtrise, Montréal, Université Concordia, Département de sciences politiques.

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1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«This project attempts to draw a bridge between the literature on immigrants and the labour market with that of gender and welfare state regimes in order to provide insight into the labour market outcomes and the particular pension outcomes of immigrants versus native-born populations. I focus most explicitly on immigrant women to demonstrate that the impact of gender and immigration, in interaction with certain welfare state policies, makes it very difficult for immigrant women to lead autonomous lives.» (p.4)

Questions/Hypothèses :
«Hypothesis 1 : The employment rates of women with young children, especially immigrant women, will increase substantially in Québec between 1996 and 2004.» (p.56) «Hypothesis 2 : The use of child care for the purpose of employment is expected to rise significantly amoung women, especially immigrant women, in Québec between 1994 and 2004.» (p.60) «Hypothesis 3 : Women, especially immigrant women, are more likely to be living in poverty in retirement years.» (p.62)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
Data from the Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) by Statistics Canada

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«Immigrants from a variety of backgrounds tend to under-perform in the labour market when compared to their Canadian-born counterparts. Of particular concern is the performance of immigrant women, who report disproportionately lower employment rates and earnings. In a liberal welfare state such as Canada, weak labour market attachments can lead to a reduced capacity for autonomy throughout the life course. Why do immigrant women lead less autonomous lives than Canadian-born women? Assumptions in public discourse imply that immigrant women are restricted by their more ’traditional’ cultures and therefore less likely to work and/or use childcare services. This thesis suggests instead that certain social policies, such as child care and pensions, can reinforce the effects of both gender and immigration on the lives of immigrant women thereby restricting their access to employment, independent earnings, and ultimately, autonomy.» (p.iii)