Offspring of Parents with Gambling Problems: Adjustment Problems and Explanatory Mechanisms

Offspring of Parents with Gambling Problems: Adjustment Problems and Explanatory Mechanisms

Offspring of Parents with Gambling Problems: Adjustment Problems and Explanatory Mechanisms

Offspring of Parents with Gambling Problems: Adjustment Problems and Explanatory Mechanismss

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Référence bibliographique [1617]

Vitaro, Frank, Wanner, Brigitte, Brendgen, Mara et Tremblay, Richard E. 2008. «Offspring of Parents with Gambling Problems: Adjustment Problems and Explanatory Mechanisms ». Journal of Gambling Studies, vol. 24, no 4, p. 535-553.

Fiche synthèse

1. Objectifs


Intentions :
«[...] [T]he first goal of the present study was to compare the depressive symptoms and conduct/antisociality problems in children of problem gamblers to the adjustment problems in children with addiction-free parents, while controlling for parents’ possible additional addictions, mental health problems and socio-demographic factors. The second goal of the present study was to examine whether the links between parental problem gambling and children’s adjustment problems are mediated by ineffective parenting alone, gambling problems in the offspring alone, or whether both processes are at work together.» (p. 538)

2. Méthode


Échantillon/Matériau :
42 children of problem gamblers
100 children of parents without gambling problems

Instruments :
DSM-III-R version of the DIS
The South Oaks Gambling Screen (SOGS)
French version of the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children (DISC-C)
South Oaks Gambling Screen for Adolescents (SOGS-RA)
Diagnostic Interview Schedule for the DSM-IV (DIS-IV)
Items drawn from the Pittsburgh Youth Study

Type de traitement des données :
Analyse statistique

3. Résumé


«We compared offspring of problem gamblers (n = 42) to offspring of parents without gambling problems (n = 100) to see (1) whether the two groups differed with respect to depressive feelings and conduct/antisociality problems and (2) whether ineffective parenting or the offspring’s own gambling problems played a mediating role in this context. [...] Parents rated their own gambling and other mental health problems when their children were in mid-adolescence. The children’s self-reports on depressive feelings and conduct/antisociality problems were assessed at two points in time: by mid-adolescence and again by early adulthood. Results showed that children of parents with gambling problems reported more depressive feelings and more conduct problems by mid-adolescence than children of parents without gambling problems. Children of problem gamblers also experienced an increase in their depressive symptoms from mid-adolescence to early adulthood. Importantly, ineffective parenting, but not children’s gambling problems, mediated almost all the links between parental problem gambling and children’s adjustment problems. These results add to a very small data base showing that children of problem gamblers are at risk for a variety of adjustment problems.» (p. 535)